Budgets for this year and the next dominate the discussion in the Capitol Tuesday.

Various members of the Obama administration venture to the Hill to pitch the president's $3.7 trillion financial roadmap for fiscal year 2012.

Office of Management and Budget Director Jacob Lew pulls double duty, appearing before the House Budget Committee in the morning and its Senate counterpart in the afternoon.

The House Ways and Means Committee hears from Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner on the matter at 1:00 p.m. ET.

Meanwhile the appropriations for one of the agencies responsible for implementing the health care law goes under the microscope in the Senate Finance Committee at 2:30 p.m. ET. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius testifies.

However, before Congress gets to funding FY 2012, they have to figure out how they plan to pay for the next seven months.

The House will start to address that issue with a stopgap spending measure known as a continuing resolution. Conservative Republicans in the conference want to slash at least $100 billion from the president's current plan for this year, and intend to offer a series of amendments to push for larger budget cuts in the measure. After a procedural vote and general debate they will get their chance while the clerk reads the entire 359-page bill. Members must introduce the amendment at the correct time in the reading (i.e. defense amendments must come while the clerk is reading the defense provisions), which means the whole affair should take a while.

The current spending resolution expires March 4, so Congress has until then to figure out a plan to avoid a government shutdown.

House Democratic leaders plan to discuss their plan for the continuing resolution at an 8:45 a.m. ET media availability. House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, and the rest of the majority's leadership team rebut at 10:00 a.m. ET.

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., hold dueling press conferences in the afternoon following their caucus' weekly policy luncheons.

We'll be following all these stories and more, so stay with Fox News for all the latest.