With Republicans positioned for big gains in the House and possibly the Senate, AEHQ takes a look back at other midterm election banner years in recent history:

1994: A GOP landslide swept through both chambers, with Republicans netting 52 seats in the House and 8 in the Senate. Republicans lost four open House seats to Democrats, but did not lose any incumbents in the House or Senate.

1982: Saddled with a deep recession and President Ronald Reagan’s sinking approval rating, Republicans during the first midterm election of Reagan’s presidency, already in the minority party, lost 26 seats to Democrats.

1974: With Election Day hitting just three months after the Watergate scandal prompted Richard M. Nixon to resign, Republicans defeated only four Democratic incumbents and won two open seats.

1966: Facing backlash against the Vietnam War, along with race riots in major cities, Democratic President Lyndon B. Johnson’s first midterm found his approval rating sinking under 50 percent. Republicans gained 47 seats, though not enough to take over the House.

1958: An economic recession, high unemployment, and the Cold War amounted to a triple threat for Republicans. Democrats added 16 seats, and Republicans lost 12.

1948: Democrats regained control of both houses of Congress, retaining their position as the nation’s majority party until 1952.

The Fox News Brainroom contributed to this report.