Few American voters like the new health care law — and most want it changed or repealed.

In addition, according to a Fox News poll released Wednesday, almost twice as many voters think changes in the law "go too far" as think they "don't go far enough."

Nearly half of voters — 45 percent — think the changes go too far, while 25 percent think the changes don't go far enough. Some 16 percent think the law includes the right amount of change.

Just 15 percent of voters like the new health care law and think it should be implemented as is. Most don't like the law in its current form: 42 percent think it needs to be changed, and another 36 percent would repeal it all together.

Click here to see the poll.

Two-thirds of those who think the law goes too far think it should be repealed all together (66 percent). A similar number of those who think the law fails to go far enough think changes should be made to it (64 percent).

The national telephone poll was conducted for Fox News by Opinion Dynamics Corp. among 900 registered voters from July 27 to July 28. For the total sample, the poll has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus 3 percentage points.

While the economy is the top issue on the minds of voters this year, health care isn't far behind.

Fifty-seven percent say the economy will be "extremely" important to their vote for Congress, and 51 percent say the same about health care.

Other top issues voters say will be "extremely" important to their votes: the federal deficit (44 percent), taxes (40 percent), terrorism (39 percent) and immigration (30 percent).

The poll found that 41 percent of voters approve of President Obama's handling of health care, and 55 percent disapprove. In April, 40 percent approved and 53 percent disapproved.

The president's highest approval ratings are on his handling of race relations (50 percent) and terrorism (49 percent). His lowest marks are on the federal deficit (31 percent approve).

All in all, 43 percent of voters approve and 50 percent disapprove of President Obama's job performance.