Today is September 11th. It's been 14 years since that horrific day our nation was forever changed. 

I was working for CBS News at the time and was supposed to fly to Nashville that morning to give a speech. 

Once I saw the second plane go into the World Trade Center I knew I wasn't going anywhere.

I felt the unbelievable pain of the people lost that day and, to be honest, I thought I was going to die that day, too.

I raced to work in New York City where I learned the Pentagon had also been hit. 

My boss grabbed me and said "I need you to go to the scene." 

I was scared. I asked if he knew what was going to happen to us and he said "no."

I went to my desk and, for the first time in my career, I cried.

I felt the unbelievable pain of the people lost that day and to be honest I thought I was going to die that day, too.

But once I got to the scene I forgot about being scared.

I reported from the pit for weeks relaying the heartbreaking news.  And it was only when I would return home late at night and turn on the TV that the full impact would hit me -- and I would cry for all of the heartsick mothers and fathers, children, friends and lovers. 

More than any other story, covering 9/11 gave me a deeper appreciation for what it meant to be a journalist. When the nation is confused and desperate, you are their lifeline. And that's why today I hope we never forget those who died, the brave first responders willing to sacrifice so much. And that we pray for our nation to continue to be safe in these still uncertain times.

Author's note: My 9/11 memories are an excerpt from my book “Getting Real.”  For more information about my book please go to www.GretchenCarlson.com.