Years ago, my mother-in-law introduced me to a simple prayer that has since become a way of life for me. On my last album, the song “Greet the Day” offers up this request:

“Lord, lead me to the ones I need.

And, to the ones who need me.”

I find that with this prayer, I am opening myself to new experiences, uncanny synchronicity, and what otherwise might seem mere coincidence. I find myself sitting with people who may need the talents and gifts unique to me, and then I find myself drawn to people who meet my need for wisdom or courage or joy.

I find that with this prayer, I am opening myself to new experiences, uncanny synchronicity, and what otherwise might seem mere coincidence. I find myself sitting with people who may need the talents and gifts unique to me, and then I find myself drawn to people who meet my need for wisdom or courage or joy.

I find that with this prayer, I am opening myself to new experiences, uncanny synchronicity, and what otherwise might seem mere coincidence. I find myself sitting with people who may need the talents and gifts unique to me, and then I find myself drawn to people who meet my need for wisdom or courage or joy.

Such was the situation recently, when I hosted Melinda Gates in Nashville as she came to meet with our vibrant faith community for the first time. I didn’t know Melinda, and she didn’t know me. But we did know each other’s work well. What an amazing experience to hear about her faith journey, how Christian music had influenced her commitment to the world’s poor, and to learn more about how I could join hands with her and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to help 120 million women around the world, to save their lives and the lives of their children.

God has a funny way of connecting us all in the Spirit.

My children and I were deeply moved when we visited Luis, one of the boys we sponsor in Guatemala. We became very fond of Luis and his mother.

Before we left, they asked to pray with us. His mother led. Then Luis wrapped his arms around me. He prayed that God would make all my music and that God would bless all the songs I sang so I could continue to be his sponsor.

That prayer completely wiped me out.

Scripture notes that, “Surely where two or more are gathered in my name, there am I with them.”

Over 220 million women around the world have raised their voices to say that they want to avoid their next pregnancy but lack the information or contraceptives to do so. To say this takes extreme courage. And to hear this and do something about it takes courage. This means talking about pregnancy and birth and newborns with influential leaders across the United States. It means discussing complications and deaths. It means looking at the statistics and rethinking contraceptives as a pro-life cause.

To do this takes a framework of compassion.

I have sat with women who live lives of such scarcity that I can only imagine their daily plight of hunger, lack clean water, and need of an education for themselves and their children. I too am a mother of four children. I can start there. I know what it means to love each of my children fully, yet differently. I know the struggles and I know the joy. In that, I can empathize with these women around the world who want a chance for education, employment, and a happier, healthier family.

Please join me in this simple prayer for God to lead us to the ones we need and to the ones who need us. And may we have the compassion and the courage to meet those needs, even for the most vulnerable mothers and children worldwide.

Grammy Award-winning singer and songwriter Amy Grant is a contributor to the recently-released "Mother & Child Project: Raising our Voices for Health and Hope," a compilation of essays from Zondervan Publishing on global maternal and child health issues, available in bookstores everywhere.