• By Bill O'Reilly

    Ask any court officer in America, and they will tell you that lying under oath is an epidemic in this country. Perjury is everywhere in the justice system. And in our daily lives, we can count on being lied to almost every day.

    The Eighth Commandment no longer an imperative in the USA. And nowhere is this better illustrated than in Washington, D.C.

    Enter the "Washington Post", which runs a column called "The Fact Checker." In that column, writer Glenn Kessler analyzes the accuracy of what powerful people say in America. This week, the "Post" announced its top falsehoods of the year and President Obama owns three of them.

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    OBAMA: If you like your plan and you like your doctor, you won't have to do a thing. You keep your plan, you keep your doctor.

    Now that Congress has left, somebody is going to be vacuuming and cleaning those floors and throwing out the garbage. They're going to have less pay.

    The day after it happened, I acknowledged that this was an act of terrorism.

    (END VIDEO CLIP)

    O'REILLY: Obviously, millions of Americans cannot keep their health care plan under Obamacare.

    Capitol Hill janitors did not take a pay cut, according to "The Post".

    And President Obama totally misled the world in his initial statements about the assassination of the American ambassador in Benghazi, Libya.

    Also on the falsehood list, the NRA saying, quote "Obama's kids are protected by armed guards at their school." Not true. There are no armed security guards at Sidwell Friends School in Washington. The children do have Secret Service protection, but that's a given.

    The "Post" cites a falsehood by Congressman Darrell Issa, who said Secretary of State Clinton denied security for Libya personnel with her signature on a cable. According to the newspaper, Secretary Clinton's signature is on every cable and it's a stamp. There is no evidence that Mrs. Clinton was even aware of the security request.

    Michele Bachmann gets a falsehood for saying 70 cents off every dollar spent on food stamps goes to bureaucrats. According to "The Post", that's simply false.

    Secretary of State John Kerry makes the list because he said he opposed the invasion of Iraq. In fact, he voted for it as a senator.

    Finally, former Florida governor, Jeb Bush, makes the list by saying that President Obama closed the U.S. embassy in Vatican City. The President had nothing to do with that decision. It was to consolidate the embassy with the Italian U.S. embassy in Rome and it was a State Department decision based on security concerns.

    Now, some of those falsehoods were mistakes. I think Jeb Bush qualifies there. But some were outright distortions. No lie, it is a disturbing situation.

    And that's "The Memo."

    - You can catch Bill O'Reilly's "Talking Points Memo" weeknights at 8 and 11 p.m. ET on the Fox News Channel and any time on foxnews.com/oreilly. Send your comments to: oreilly@foxnews.com.