• Now, this is what is going to end up happening. At some point in time, one of the people that's going to be attacked is going to have a concealed weapons license. They are going to draw down and, unfortunately, someone is going to get shot. Then what is going to happen? You will hear all of the rhetoric coming out from the Al Sharptons and Jesse Jacksons that this unarmed black teenager was shot and killed and assaulted, when right now they should be out there stopping this so we don't get to this point.

    VAN SUSTEREN: They have been silent. And the president, attorney general also role models in the African-American community, but one --

    (CROSSTALK)

    WEST: This doesn't fit their political narrative.

    VAN SUSTEREN: Obviously, the ones who do it, they're criminals, arrest them, process them or whatever. Those who laugh may be aiders and abettors, has encouraging them, deal with them, too.

    The thing that concerns me, a lot of these communities have 12 and 13- year-olds who look up to older people in the community. There is always the peer pressure. If we don't stop this now -- sort of immaturity of a 13-year-old -- is a 13-year-old going to follow suit and do something really stupid, have the person die or end up in prison, and no one is speaking out to try to stop this now.

    WEST: Well, you have already seen this happen. Think about down in Brunswick, Georgia, where the two black teenagers shot the white baby in the face. And so now that's, again, a life that has been lost because no one intervened and no one tried to get in those communities. You have got a breakdown. It's not just the family. It's the education opportunities, job opportunities. We should not have these roving gangs out there saying, we are going to knock someone out just for fun. They should be studying.

    VAN SUSTEREN: One attacker, I should tell you, in Michigan, was shot. So we are seeing a little bit of that already.

    What should President Obama do, if anything? I mean, is there anything? Would making a statement or putting this out as public dialogue, would that help?

    WEST: It would help. You can't just cherry-pick when you go in to intervene. You can't look at the Skip Gates issue and say the police officers up there --

    VAN SUSTEREN: Harvard.

    WEST: Absolutely. Acted stupidly. You can't jump in and say Trayvon Martin, or it could have been me or it could have been my son. Then you have these instances where you just complete (INAUDIBLE). I think this is an opportunity for him to show some leadership. But once again, it doesn't fit that political narrative.

    VAN SUSTEREN: How about Jesse Jackson and Reverend Sharpton? They can certainly draw attention. They can draw attention toward important issues. Why are they silent?

    WEST: There's no profit in it for them. There's no political gain or political advantage for them. So why --

    VAN SUSTEREN: How about helping these neighborhoods? This is terrorizing some of the inner-city neighborhoods.

    WEST: They don't care. They live off victimization. Therefore, as long as you have black communities that see themselves as victims, that helps to perpetuate their existence. Now, all of the sudden, if you jump in -- why aren't they saying anything in Chicago about the black-on-black crime? They don't have a point in that. It doesn't elevate them whatsoever. That's why these guys should be totally irrelevant and should not be listened to whatsoever.

    VAN SUSTEREN: We got to get this dialogue going. We can't do it just from ON THE RECORD here, 7:00 at night, because that's not going to start the dialogue, but we are trying.

    Anyway, Congressman, nice to see you.

    WEST: Let's you and I go into a black community and --

    (CROSSTALK)

    VAN SUSTEREN: I will go. For 12 years, I represented poor people. I have more experience on the street being a sort of community activists in the inner cities than a lot of other people.

    WEST: Let's have a road show.

    VAN SUSTEREN: Indeed, we will.

    Nice to see you.

    WEST: Pleasure.