• With: Dan Henninger, Dorothy Rabinowitz, Jason Riley, Kim Strassel

    GIGOT: Is that a winner?

    (LAUGHTER)

    HENNINGER: You're going to hear more carping and complaining about the unfairness of America next week because that's in their DNA, that's the way they see the system.

    GIGOT: Yes. All because of business and Romney's friends.

    HENNINGER: But it does not present a positive image to the American people.

    RILEY: I think another thing that may not be a winner but you nevertheless is hear a lot about is Obama-care, particularly those parts of the health care plan that have taken effect. Children being able to stay on parent's insurance up to a certain age. They'll push that.

    GIGOT: So they'll push that, that -- the two or three positive parts of Obama-care that poll well, even though the Republicans really did a pretty good job this week of taking apart Obama-care. Do you think they'll talk about it?

    RILEY: I think they will. And of course, that's a huge vulnerability for Romney going into the debates. I don't think they'll shy away from talking about Obama-care.

    One thing we haven't mentioned here? Second term agenda.

    (LAUGHTER)

    What's the case that Obama is going to make, Kim, Dorothy, for a second term agenda?

    First you, Kim.

    STRASSEL: Well, he's going to revive some of the retread arguments he put out last year, which is mostly going to be more spending. I'm going to pay for your kids to go to college. I'm going to -- let's put more stimulus money into construction jobs. That's about all they've got. and do not expect to see any big policy initiatives put forward here. They don't have any.

    GIGOT: Dorothy?

    RABINOWITZ: Well, what can he say? I'm going to be former friable and offer the Soviet Union -- the former Soviet Union more leisure --

    (CROSSTALK)

    (LAUGHTER)

    GIGOT: Another reset, you mean?

    RABINOWITZ: Another reset. But I think we're going to hear a little about abortion and about the assault on women, and the fact that we are going to save a woman's right to choice.

    GIGOT: And so, that women's issue --

    (CROSSTALK)

    GIGOT: I think we may also see windmills and the Chevy Volt on stage --

    (LAUGHTER)

    -- for the green jobs before it's over. Maybe one of them will speak, I don't know, as they try to make the case in Iowa and Michigan that the auto bailout helped.

    We have to take one more break. When we come back, our "Hits and Misses" of the week.

    (COMMERCIAL BREAK)

    GIGOT: Time now for "Hits and Misses" of the week.

    Kim, first to you.

    STRASSEL: This is a miss to Ron Paul for being a bit of a sore loser. It was Mr. Paul's decision to run as a Republican this year that finally gave him the perk to have a more visible and successful campaign. And the Republicans in Tampa paid him more note than any other of Mr. Romney's opponents. There was a video tribute, his son spoke, some of his ideas were in the GOP platform. And yet, Mr. Paul has refused to endorse the man who won his party's nomination. Mitt Romney may not be his ideal version of a president, but he's a lot closer than President Obama.

    GIGOT: All right. Jason?

    RILEY: This is a miss for Pat Quinn, the Democratic governor of Illinois. This week S&P downgraded the state's credit rating. It's not addressing its budget deficits and pension liabilities. Ironically, some surrounding states, like Ohio and Wisconsin, are effectively addressing the issue. Their governors are speaking in Tampa this week. I hope that Pat Quinn was watching.

    GIGOT: I don't know that he's going to making a guest appearance in Charlotte.

    (LAUGHTER)

    GIGOT: We'll see.

    All right, Dan?

    HENNINGER: Paul, there was a lot of patriotism at the Republican convention. And a piece of that is returning to Yale University this fall. For the first time in 40 years, ROTC is back on campus at Yale. These students are coming from the naval submarine base in Groton, Connecticut. And I should add that Columbia and Harvard are also going to have ROTC back on campus. So however the divided the country may be right now, this is a good thing.

    GIGOT: It's extraordinary. Because that means -- ROTC was last on Yale campus before I went to college, which is pretty extraordinary when you think about this ancient Mariner.

    (LAUGHTER)

    Remember, if you have your own "Hit or Miss," please send it to us at jer@FOXnews.com and follow us on Twitter, @JERonFNC.

    That's it for this edition of the "Journal Editorial Report." Thanks to my panel, especially to you for watching. I'm Paul Gigot. We hope to see you right here next week.