• This is a rush transcript from "The Journal Editorial Report," February 3, 2007.

    PAUL GIGOT, HOST: This week on the "Journal Editorial Report."

    (BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

    SEN. RUSS FEINGOLD, D-WISC.: Congress has the power to stop the war, if it wants to.

    (END VIDEO CLIP)

    GIGOT: What Congress can and can't do to block the president's plans in Iraq.

    Plus, week two of the Scooter Libby trial puts journalist's memories to the test. Did they pass?

    And new economic numbers put fear into the slow down to rest. What's behind the boom? And how can we keep it going?

    Our panel weighs in, after these headlines.

    (NEWSBREAK)

    GIGOT: Welcome to the "Journal Editorial Report." I'm Paul Gigot.

    Opponents of President Bush's troop buildup in Iraq began laying the groundwork this week for an effort to place new limits on the conduct of the war, with members of both parties questioning the commander in chief's constitutional authority.

    (BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

    SEN. ARLEN SPECTOR, R-PA.: The president repeatedly makes reference to the fact that he is the decider. I would suggest, and suggest respectfully to the president that he is not the sole decider.

    Attorney David Rivkin served in the Justice Department under Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush. He joins me now from Washington.

    David, welcome to the program.

    DAVID RIVKIN, FORMER JUSTICE DEPARTMENT ATTORNEY: Good to be with you.

    GIGOT: Does Congress have the power, the constitutional power to stop the president's new strategy in Iraq?

    RIVKIN: No, Congress does not have a power to stop the president's new strategy, Paul. Congress has the power to bring an end to the entire U.S. military engagement in Iraq by cutting off all the funds for military operations in Iraq.

    GIGOT: So it can, through the power of the purse, which it has under the constitution, it can cut off funds for the entire operation of Iraq? You agree with that?