Beer

Meet America's first 'beermeister' at sea

Not all cruise ships are created equal

 

Just eight short months ago, brewmaster Colin Presby was creating craft beer in his hometown of Reading, Penn., when he saw a cruise gig advertised online. Today, he’s a full-time fixture aboard the new Carnival Vista cruise ship, where he runs the first US brewery at sea.

“It’s been quite a change,” says the 32-year-old of his transition from landlubber to beermeister at sea.

Having spent the summer sailing the ports of Europe, Presby and the 3,936-passenger Vista, which made its maiden voyage in May last year, have now settled into the ship’s homeport of Miami.

The largest and newest ship in the Carnival fleet, which offers 4- to 8-day Caribbean itineraries heading out four times a month, has a host of unique amenities, like the SkyRide — a kind of sit-in bicycle that guests can pedal around a monorail suspended high above the pool — and a Multiplex featuring an IMAX cinema and a multi-sensory special effects Thrill Theater. That’s in addition to the water park, three pools and 17 dining choices.

But for some, that will all pale to the Caribbean-themed RedFrog Pub & Brewery, one of the ship’s 13 bars. With its pioneering on-board brewery, it’s set to be ground zero for all beer lovers on board.

“We wanted to bring fresh craft beer to the ship and the best way to do it was to make it right here,” says Presby, waving towards the glistening German-made fermenters, kettles and coolers that are on full display over the length of the pub.

Currently there are three beers made on board. ThirstyFrog Port Hoppin’ IPA is the most popular, and has fruity, floral and hop notes. The ThirstyFrog Caribbean Wheat is an unfiltered lager, while the FriskyFrog Java Stout is a take on a traditional stout — dark and creamy with hints of coffee.

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As for Presby, he began homebrewing in 2006 with the guidance of one of his chemistry professors at Franklin & Marshall. After that, he studied under Carol Stoudt, something of a legend in the brewing world, working with her at Weyerbacher Brewing Company and Stoudts Brewing.

The article originally appeared in the New York Post.