A treasure trove of classic cars has been revealed in central France.

It’s believed they were first hidden away in the quarry where they lie today as Nazi forces invaded the country in World War II.

Belgian photographer Vincent Michel captured the cars on film, most of them rusted beyond repair.

“We suppose the cars were brought into the quarry at the start of the war to stop them being seized,” he says.

Citroens, Renaults and Peugeots can be spotted among the dozens of cars parked neatly in rows. The condition of some suggests they may have been damaged before they were stored away, or cannibalized for parts later on.

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A few vehicles were added over the years by the owner of the quarry, including what appears to be a 1960 Opel Kapitän that still wears its blue paint.

“Shortly after we were there the owner pulled a few of them out to sell at auction, but most of the cars are still at peace inside the quarry, too damaged to move,” Michel says.

Michel doesn’t know exactly why the cars weren’t retrieved and hasn’t revealed the precise location of his discovery, but hopes it isn’t the last of its kind.

“It was an unbelievable experience, and I really hope to find a similar place in the future.”

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