Indian election officials trek 34 miles through remote forest for 1 voter

Indian election officials trekked deep into the jungle-- through an animal sanctuary filled with lions-- to set up a polling station for one voter, according to a report.

The voter, Mahant Bharatdas Darshandas, is a priest who has lived in Gujarat’s Gir Forest for more than 20 years, Reuters reported.

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Darshandas has voted in every election in at least the last 15 years, according to NDTV. Election officials reportedly make the 34-mile journey through the forest every election so he can cast his ballot. “There is just one booth here and the government spends a lot on this one booth,” Darshandas told reporters after casting his vote in the third phase of the historic election.

Voting in India is in seven phases and lasts more than a month, ending on May 19. Voters will elect 543 members of parliament. India has approximately one million polling stations for 900 million eligible voters.

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"For 100 percent voter turnout everywhere, I request all to go and vote," Darshandas added.