Africa by Toto to play on loop 'for all eternity' in desert thanks to artist installation

If it takes a lot to drag you away from playing Toto's hit song Africa, then head to the world's oldest desert where it's set to play on loop for eternity.

Namibian-German artist Max Siedentopf has set up a sound installation somewhere in the Namib Desert in the coastal areas of Namibia, which consists of six speakers attached to an MP3 that only has one song on it: Toto's Africa.

If you want to hear Toto's hit Africa from now until eternity, head to an art installation in the Namibia desert.

If you want to hear Toto's hit Africa from now until eternity, head to an art installation in the Namibia desert. (Photo by Chris McKay/WireImage)

"The song is put on loop and the installation runs on solar batteries to keep Toto going for all eternity," he said in a post on his website titled "Toto Forever."

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The 27-year-old artist said he chose the undisclosed spot in the desert to pay tribute to "probably the most popular song of the last four decades."

The multiplatinum-selling soft rock classic, released in 1982, topped Spotify's "Top Throwback Songs" old in 2018. It's also seen a resurgence with a recent cover by Weezer. The song even has a Twitter account that sends out bits of lyrics daily.

In September, a music venue in Bristol, England played the song for 12 hours straight to raise funds for charity, according to Sky News. A Burger King in London also played it for an entire day last year.

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Siedentopf told the BBC that some Namibians "love it," while others have told him it's the "the worst sound installation ever."

He added that he chose the spot in the desert in the hopes the song will continue to play for another 55 million years.

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"Most parts of the installation were chosen to be as durable as possible, but I'm sure the harsh environment of the desert will devour the installation eventually," Siedentopf said.