Ghislaine Maxwell depositions ordered released by Thursday morning

The interview transcripts cover more than 400 pages

A New York judge ordered years-old Ghislaine Maxwell depositions revealing details about her relationship with alleged sex trafficker Jeffrey Epstein to be released to the public by Thursday morning.

U.S. District Judge Loretta Preska ruled Tuesday the conversations between lawyers for alleged Epstein victim Virginia Giuffre and Maxwell be released following a decision by a federal appeals court finding arguments by Maxwell's lawyers to keep them sealed to be meritless.

Her lawyers had appealed a judge's July ruling to allow the release of the transcripts of two depositions in which she answered questions before the lawsuit was settled. The judge had concluded there was a presumption of public access to deposition materials.

Epstein died last year in a New York detention center after being charged with sex trafficking in what was ruled a suicide.

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The two days of depositions were taken in 2016 in connection with a defamation suit Giuffre brought against Maxwell, which has since been settled, according to The Daily Beast.

Maxwell’s lawyers had argued the depositions should remain private because they contained “intimate” details about her life and claimed it could interfere with her ability to receive a fair trial.

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Maxwell, accused of helping recruit girls to be sex trafficked by Epstein, was arrested in July and has pleaded not guilty. She faces up to 35 years in prison if convicted.

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Sigrid McCawley, a lawyer for Giuffre, in a statement, called the Monday appeals court ruling "an important step towards vindicating the public interest in understanding the scope and scale of Jeffrey Epstein's sex trafficking ring and the efforts made to conceal it."

Fox News' Bradford Betz and The Associated Press contributed to this report.