Illinois road shut down for massive snake migration — and some are venomous

Snake Road in Shawnee National is being shut down to vehicles to allow for the safe passage of endangered snakes

Wildlife authorities in Illinois have shut down a two-mile stretch of road to vehicles through late October due to a yearly snake migration. 

The U.S. Forest Service said Forest Road #345 – also known as "Snake Road" – in the Shawnee National Forest was closed to vehicles starting September 1st and will remain closed through October 30th. It’s also closed every year for a short time in the Spring. 

Snake Road, located in the Shawnee National Forest.

Snake Road, located in the Shawnee National Forest. (USDA)

COLORADO CLIMBER DIES AFTER FALLING 900 FEET FROM CAPITOL PEAK

The snakes migrate from LaRue Swamp to the nearby limestone bluffs, according to the Illinois Department of Natural Resources. Some of the snakes and amphibians are considered threatened and endangered in the Prairie State and closing the road helps them cross safely. 

While vehicles are not allowed on the road, it will remain open to people traveling on foot – though it’s unclear how many visitors the area gets this time of year. 

A female copperhead snake (Agkistrodon contortrix) and her offspring.

A female copperhead snake (Agkistrodon contortrix) and her offspring. (© Charles Smith & Pam Eskridge)

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

USDA says Snake Road is home to 23 species of snakes, some of which are venomous including rattlers and copperheads, and one of the few places in North America where so many can be seen in one geographical location.