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Florida teacher praises good Samaritan who returned missing wallet

'People are naturally good'

An 8th grade teacher in Florida got a call this week that she wasn't expecting. 

It was the good Samaritan who hand-delivered her wallet to her after she dropped it in a Walmart parking lot last weekend. 

"I was like, 'did I dream this or what?'" Debra Glover-Crosby told Fox News.

For several days Debra Glover-Crosby had been trying to track down her "hero" to properly thank him for his kind gesture. 

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Glover-Crosby said she was shopping in the checkout line at the Jacksonville store last weekend when she noticed her wallet wasn't there. 

"I was in panic mode," she said. 

To make matters worse, Glover-Crosby said her husband was out of town and she had very minimal cash on hand to carry her through until he got back.

When she got home she was astounded to find her wallet waiting for her right by the front door. 

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Footage from Glover-Crosby's home security camera, which she later posted to Facebook, showed the good Samaritan trying to deliver her wallet personally. 

"Hey, how are you doing? I found your wallet at Walmart," the man said to the camera after no one answered the door. 

"I’m going to put it by the Amazon boxes," he continued. 

It was something Glover-Crosby never expected. 

"That is above and beyond," she said. "I probably would have turned it into customer service or something, but I never would have thought to drive it all the way to the person it belonged to."

When Glover-Crosby asked why he had gone to such lengths, he said "that's the way he was raised." 

Glover-Crosby said it was the perfect story to tell her students on their weekly "What Would You Do?" Fridays. 

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It is modeled after the ABC series of the same name, which creates scenarios -- often of a conflicting nature -- to see how people react when no one is watching. The show records the reactions on hidden camera. 

This past weekend reminded Glover-Crosby that "people are naturally good," she said. 

It's something she hopes to instill in her students, especially during the pandemic.

"When there's so much negativity happening, we have to focus on those positive things to lift our spirits," she said. "We can choose to focus on the negatives, but I choose to focus on the positive. And that's how I get my days."