Dust storm in Nevada captured on satellite racing across Mojave desert

Dust storms, or haboobs, can form walls of dust that reach thousands of miles in height

These winds were so fierce, the dust storm they whipped up over the Southwest could be seen from space.

The storm stretched from Sunday night into the early hours of Monday morning across Nevada's Mojave Desert.

Imagery from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) GOES-West satellite shows the dust racing southward, as smoke from the Brown and Twin wildfires released plumes of smoke.

As daytime fades to darkness, the lights of Las Vegas can be seen in the corner of the satellite imagery.

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The dust storm was described as "particularly intense" by NOAA.

A dust storm can be seen racing across Nevada's Mojave Desert on June 28.

A dust storm can be seen racing across Nevada's Mojave Desert on June 28. (NOAA)

"These types of dust storms are known as haboobs, and occur in dry regions throughout the world," NOAA said on Tuesday. "The word itself is derived from the Arabic word, habb, which means 'to blow' or 'strong wind.'"

According to the World Meteorological Organization, dust storms usually occur when strong winds lift large amounts of sand and dust from bare, dry soils into the atmosphere. They are usually caused by thunderstorms.

Besides creating visibility issues and travel delays, the WMO said airborne dust also presents "serious risks" for health.

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According to the National Weather Service (NWS), dust storms and haboobs can occur anywhere in the U.S. but are most common in the Southwest. They are a result of thunderstorm winds.

In the Southwest, these types of storms are "relatively common" during the North American Monsoon Season, which is an increased period of thunderstorms and rainfall from July through September.

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Dust storms present the biggest threat to motorists, as the advancing wall of dust and debris may be miles long and several thousand feet high. Since dust storms strike with little warning, they can make driving conditions especially hazardous.

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"Blinding, choking dust can quickly reduce visibility, causing accidents that may involve chain collisions, creating massive pileups," according to the NWS. "Dust storms usually last only a few minutes, but the actions a motorist takes during the storm may be the most important of his or her life."