Del Rio residents sound off on Biden's handling of migrant surge

Texas border town reacts to Biden administration's handling of latest migrant surge

Del Rio, Texas, residents who spoke with Fox News were frustrated with how President Biden handled the recent migrant surge at the southern border.

"I feel that it's the fault of the president," one local told Fox News. Immigrants "felt they had been promised by the president that they would become United States citizens," they said.

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As many as 15,000 migrants recently crossed the U.S.'s southern border and gathered under the Del Rio International Bridge.

Some residents said they felt the Biden administration has not done enough to stop the surge in migrants arriving at their border.

"They've done nothing, zero, zilch," Diane, a local who lives right on the border, told Fox News.

Laura, who grew up in Del Rio, said she felt the Biden administration took a long time to handle the situation.

"It's been mounting bit by bit," she told Fox News. "It's not just a thing that happened over the course of one week."

But some felt the Biden administration was placed in a difficult spot, given the large number of migrants.

"When you get 10, 12,000 people together like that, it's hard to handle it anyway," Miguel Chavez, a local restaurant owner, told Fox News.

"It was so many people. I think they did a great job," Lulu, manager of Church's Chicken in Del Rio, told Fox News.

Del Rio residents also felt more attention needed to be placed on their own community before helping immigrants.

"We need to take care of our own people … our poor people … our vets," Diane told Fox News, adding that she had to install security cameras and lights to her home since immigrants often cross into her yard.

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Chavez told Fox News he welcomed immigrants but that the recent surge was too many.

"Yeah, I welcome immigrants, but not to that point. It's hard being here as it is," Chavez said. "I see their problems and I try to feel for them, but we have our own problems."

Erika Mouynes, the foreign minister of Panama, where many immigrants pass through before traveling through Mexico to the U.S., told Axios last week she believes that as many as 60,000 migrants were headed to the U.S.