AMA faces backlash after opposing putting sex on birth certificates

AMA LGBTQ committee worries marking a person's sex would encourage 'marginalization'

The American Medical Association (AMA) is receiving criticism after its House of Delegates called for removing sex markers on birth certificates, with an advisory committee arguing that their inclusion "perpetuates a view that [sex] is immutable."

The measure was publicized by the Board of Trustees in June and previously proposed by the House of Delegates, which is the organization's policymaking entity. 

It caught renewed attention after WebMD tweeted about it over the weekend. Backed by the AMA LGBTQ Advisory Committee, it favors removing sex on the public portion of the birth certificate and allows "that it be visible for medical and statistical use only."

The committee worried that marking a person's sex would encourage "marginalization and minoritization."

"Assigning sex using a binary variable and placing it on the public portion of the birth certificate  perpetuates a view that it is immutable and fails to recognize the medical spectrum of gender identity," a portion of the AMA report reads. 

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"Participation by the medical profession and the government in assigning sex is often used as evidence supporting this binary view. Imposing such a categorization system risks stifling self expression and self-identification and contributes to marginalization and minoritization."

Many responded by deriding the AMA on Twitter. "So much Sciencing™," tweeted conservative commentator Ben Shapiro. Author and American Enterprise Institute scholar Christina Sommers tweeted: "Another once-trusted institution has lost its mind."

Former United Nations ambassador Nikki Haley and Rep. Elise Stefanik, R-N.Y. also took aim at the organization.

"This is literally the most ridiculous thing I have ever heard. Stop the madness!" she said.

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Founded in 1847, the organization has also come under fire for a plan promoting critical race theory and disparaging the "myth of meritocracy."