Alaska’s largest city sees record 90 degrees, other cities hit all-time highs

The largest city in Alaska shattered its all-time temperature record on Independence Day as the northern-most state swelters under a heat dome.

The National Weather Service revealed Friday that Anchorage reached a record 90 degrees in the afternoon on the Fourth of July, beating out the previous record set June 14, 1969, by five degrees.

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Anchorage was not the only city in Alaska to break all-time records on Thursday.

Kenai and King Salmon also reached new high temperatures of 89 degrees – the previous records were 87 degrees in Kenai set on June 26, 1953, and 88 degrees in King Salmon set on June 27, 1953.

The city of Palmer tied its all-time high record at 88, which had been previously set on May 27, 2011.

ANCHORAGE, AK - JULY 04: People navigate the Turnagain Arm on paddle boards as vehicles move along the Seward Highway on July 4, 2019 south of Anchorage, Alaska. Alaska is bracing for record warm temperatures and dry conditions in parts of the state. (Photo by Lance King/Getty Images)

ANCHORAGE, AK - JULY 04: People navigate the Turnagain Arm on paddle boards as vehicles move along the Seward Highway on July 4, 2019 south of Anchorage, Alaska. Alaska is bracing for record warm temperatures and dry conditions in parts of the state. (Photo by Lance King/Getty Images)

Meteorologist Bob Clay said a high-pressure ridge over much of south-central Alaska is strengthening and responsible for the record temperatures.

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While 90 degrees is a record in Anchorage, it is not the highest temperature the state has experienced.

According to records kept by the National Weather Service, Fairbanks made a run at 100 when the mercury topped out at 99 on July 28, 1919. The same city also recorded a 93-degree temperature on August 5, 1994.

In Fort Yukon, which is situated in central eastern Alaska, the temperature rose to 100 degrees in 1915.

On Thursday, four cities – including Anchorage – also saw daily high-temperature records for July 4.

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Forecasters said the sizzling temps will remain for the coming days and warned about the possibility of increased wildfire activity and smoke.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.