Washington's nickname offended 'millions' for generations, tribal leader says

Fawn Sharp: 'Before I was even born there was a resolution calling for the mascot issue and every generation of tribal leader since'

Washington’s NFL team was pushed to change its name, but the franchise wouldn’t budge.

According to the president of the largest Native American government in the United States, they’ve been trying to get Washington to change its team name for decades.

FORMER WASHINGTON PLAYERS SPEAK OUT ON NAME CHANGE: 'I'LL ALWAYS CALL THEM THE WASHINGTON REDSKINS'

Fawn Sharp, the leader of the National Congress of American Indians, spoke to TMZ Sports, and she said that the NCAI is happy that the team is getting rid of the “Redskins” nickname, but she just couldn’t understand why it took so long.

"We've passed resolutions at the National Congress that go back to 1968,” Sharp told TMZ. “Before I was even born there was a resolution calling for the mascot issue and every generation of tribal leader since.”

POST-REDSKINS, WASHINGTON HAS LONG ROAD TOWARD NEW NICKNAME

Even though Washington argued that Native Americans supposedly weren’t offended by the racist name, Sharp told the website that they have made their position clear for years. TMZ also asked her about the Atlanta Braves putting an end to the famous “Tomahawk Chop” tradition. Sharp is encouraging that to change as well.

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"Yes we have discussed it, and this is another issue where we really pay attention to our young people," Sharp said. "We have a generation that's being born into a society that's learning our languages. For centuries we were punished for speaking our language. they're learning our song, our dance, our ceremonies.

“They're learning the value of cultural practices,” Sharp added. “When they know the value of that and they see others making fun of it, it hurts them in a way that's even deeper than what we've experienced thus far.”