Top gymnasts call on Congress to dissolve US Olympic committee board

Simone Biles, McKayla Maroney, Aly Raisman and Maggie Nichols wrote letter to Sens. Blumenthal and Moran

Simone Biles, McKayla Maroney, Aly Raisman and Maggie Nichols called on Congress to dissolve the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Committee's (USOPC) board of directors.

In a letter to Sens. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., and Jerry Moran, R-Kan., the four Olympic gymnasts wrote the USOPC ignored sexual abuse for decades and failed to take the steps to end the environment of abuse within Olympic sports.

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United States Olympic gymnast Simone Biles testifies during a Senate Judiciary hearing about the Inspector General's report on the FBI's handling of the Larry Nassar investigation on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, Sept. 15, 2021, in Washington. 

United States Olympic gymnast Simone Biles testifies during a Senate Judiciary hearing about the Inspector General's report on the FBI's handling of the Larry Nassar investigation on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, Sept. 15, 2021, in Washington.  (Graeme Jennings/Pool via AP)

"We make this request after years of patience, deliberation, and unrequited commitment to learn from our suffering and make amateur sports safe for future generations. We believe the Board’s past actions demonstrate an unwillingness to confront the endemic problems with abuse that athletes like us have faced and a continued refusal to pursue true and necessary reform of the broken Olympic system," the letter read, according to The Wall Street Journal.

The letter called on congressional leaders to pass a resolution by Nov. 1 to dissolve the USOPC board under the Empowering Olympians and Paralympians and Amateur Athlete Act of 2020, according to the Orange County Register. Blumenthal and Moran were the co-authors of the bill and gave Congress ways to dissolve the board of directors.

The gymnasts said the board should be replaced by those who are willing to "responsibly" investigate "sexual abuse within Olympic organizations—including the USOPC—and all efforts to conceal it."

United States gymnasts from left, Simone Biles, McKayla Maroney and Aly Raisman arrive for a Senate Judiciary hearing about the Inspector General's report on the FBI's handling of the Larry Nassar investigation on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, Sept. 15, 2021, in Washington. 

United States gymnasts from left, Simone Biles, McKayla Maroney and Aly Raisman arrive for a Senate Judiciary hearing about the Inspector General's report on the FBI's handling of the Larry Nassar investigation on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, Sept. 15, 2021, in Washington.  (Graeme Jennings/Pool via AP)

SIMONE BILES SAYS SHE 'SHOULD HAVE QUIT WAY BEFORE TOKYO' FOLLOWING NASSAR ABUSE

The four women testified in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee last month, slamming the handling of the Larry Nassar investigation and alleged the FBI "turned a blind eye" to the abuses perpetrated by the disgraced former doctor. The gymnasts called out the Department of Justice for not taking action against the members of the FBI who failed them.

In the second portion of the hearing, Inspector General Michael Horowitz and FBI Director Chris Wary testified. Horowitz confirmed that as a result of his investigation, there were two FBI agents whose conduct was referred for a criminal investigation, but so far no prosecutions have resulted from this.

Wray denied having knowledge as to why no cases have been brought, saying this was "a decision by the Justice Department," while noting that he fired one of the agents.

U.S. Olympic gymnasts Simone Biles, McKayla Maroney, Aly Raisman and Maggie Nichols arrive to testify during a Senate Judiciary hearing about the Inspector General's report on the FBI handling of the Larry Nassar investigation of sexual abuse of Olympic gymnasts, on Capitol Hill, in Washington, D.C., Sept. 15, 2021.

U.S. Olympic gymnasts Simone Biles, McKayla Maroney, Aly Raisman and Maggie Nichols arrive to testify during a Senate Judiciary hearing about the Inspector General's report on the FBI handling of the Larry Nassar investigation of sexual abuse of Olympic gymnasts, on Capitol Hill, in Washington, D.C., Sept. 15, 2021. (Saul Loeb/Pool via REUTERS)

The USOPC told The Wall Street Journal it had "deep respect and empathy for the survivors of abuse. The letter addressed to Congress underscores their concern, and we recognize the bravery of the athlete survivors who continue to bring these issues forward."

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The USOPC added that its actions, including an investigation into the response to Nassar, cooperating with congressional probes and overhauling the U.S. Center for SafeSport, "led to significant widespread changes to prevent such reprehensible acts from ever occurring again."

Fox News' Ronn Blitzer contributed to this report.