Massachusetts wildlife center rescues 2 bald eagles showing signs of starvation, other health issues

Officials at a wildlife rehabilitation center in Eastham, Mass., have taken two sickly, juvenile bald eagles under their wing.

The rehabilitation center — Wild Care — was first contacted last week about an eagle “behaving abnormally” in Harwich, a town in Massachusetts. The Barnstable Patriot, citing Jayne Fowler, a Wildlife Rehabilitation assistant at Wild Care, reports the bird would fly to the ground and “chew on beach towels.”

ONE-WINGED BALD EAGLE’S SNATCHING FROM LONG ISLAND REFUGE LEADS TO HEFTY REWARD

The bird was later rescued and after its examination at Wild Care, was determined to be anemic or possibly have intestinal parasites. It also showed signs of starvation, per the newspaper.

The eagle — which had been banded by the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife — was stable after it was given “fluids and liquid nutrition.”

On Saturday, Wild Care officials were notified of another young, potentially sickly bald eagle after it was spotted crashing into a resident's deck in Truro. The bird was officially rescued the following day and brought to the rehabilitation facility.

The second eagle was suffering from anemia as well and, not unlike the first, also showed signs of starvation. Its left eye was also injured, according to The Barnstable Patriot.

Both eagles are now stable.

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Stephanie Ellis, Wild Care’s executive director, told the newspaper that having two eagles in their care is “unprecedented.” Ellis noted the last time they had an eagle at the facility was in 2012.

“These two birds are stable and we are hopeful for a full recovery. Wild Care has an extremely large raptor aviary that meets the State of Massachusetts’ minimum size requirements, to house and condition eagles for release,” Ellis added. “I am extremely grateful we have great accommodations for these magnificent birds, and that we have support from local veterinarians and MassWildlife. We are hoping for the best, and hope to get these incredible creatures back on the wing, as soon as possible.”

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