Cicadas are 'peeing' on communities across eastern US: report

Sensation is known as 'honeydew'

Brood X periodical cicadas are reportedly "peeing" on communities around the eastern United States.

The trillions of red-eyed insects are emerging in parks, backyards and wooded areas across approximately 15 states, sending residents abuzz. 

CICADAS TAKE OVER THE CAPITOL GROUNDS, 'CICADA, CICADA. WHERE HAVE YOU BEEN?'

A new report from The Washington Post highlighted the issue of frequent cicada "urination," particularly on warmer days when it falls from cicadas on tree branches "like a gentle rain shower" of "watery tree sap." 

An adult cicada in Washington, Thursday, May 6, 2021. Trillions of cicadas are about to emerge from 15 states in the U.S. East. The cicadas of Brood X, trillions of red-eyed bugs singing loud sci-fi-sounding songs, can seem downright creepy. Especially since they come out from underground only every 17 years.  (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

An adult cicada in Washington, Thursday, May 6, 2021. Trillions of cicadas are about to emerge from 15 states in the U.S. East. The cicadas of Brood X, trillions of red-eyed bugs singing loud sci-fi-sounding songs, can seem downright creepy. Especially since they come out from underground only every 17 years.  (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Fortunately, the excretion is not a danger, much like the cicadas themselves.

Mount St. Joseph University's Gene Kritsky told Cincinnati's WLWT on Wednesday that the cicadas are not exactly peeing but need to stay hydrated and trying to warn curious human beings away.

A common name for the fluid is "honeydew," as it contains sucrose, WLWT reported. 

BROOD X CICADAS HIT WASHINGTON'S CAPITOL HILL

The University of Maryland Department of Entomology's associate professor Daniel Gruner told the Post on Tuesday that adult cicadas are the most active on the hottest days because they have the ability to "tap into the dilute, watery xylem fluid of deciduous trees."

According to Encyclopedia Brittanica, xylem sap found in trees carries nutrients from the root system to the leaves.

Gruner said an excess of fluids causes the insects to "pee liberally," though colleague Paula Shrewsbury noted the sensation would just feel like a "small drop or two." 

The university's professor emeritus Michael Raupp told Fox News via email on Wednesday that Shrewsbury was "exactly correct." 

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

Across the board, the advice to Americans was to put on a hat to shield from "cicada rain" – fortunately only a concern through the Fourth of July.