Texas governor signs bill legalizing kids' lemonade stands

Kids in Texas will now be able to run lemonade stands without fear of police shutting them down.

Gov. Greg Abbott, a Republican, signed a bill on Monday that legalizes temporary lemonade stands -- and other stands selling nonalcoholic drinks -- run by minors on private property or in public parks.

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"Here's a common sense law. We had to pass it because police shut down a lemonade stand here in Texas. " Abbott said before signing the legislation into law and then holding a glass of lemonade in a video posted to Twitter. "So kids... cheers."

In 2015, police in the East Texas town of Overton shuttered a lemonade stand run by two sisters because the pair lacked a $150 peddlers' permit.

The Texas law comes as several kid-run lemonade stands across the country have been shut down because of complaints or a lack of licensure. In 2018, police in a Denver suburb closed a boy's stand after he couldn't produce a permit following a complaint from a neighbor.

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A Florida homeowners association in 2015 shut down an 11-year-old boy's lemonade business venture because he set it up in the wrong spot.

The new Texas law takes effect Sept. 1.