Reporting on Russia collusion claims shows why Americans have lost trust in media, Joe Concha says

With Special Counsel Robert Mueller's report on Russia's meddling in the 2016 presidential election expected soon, Tucker Carlson on Monday night discussed the media’s role in spreading the narrative that then-candidate Donald Trump colluded with Russia to take the White House.

“The [Christopher Steele] dossier and the special counsel has already accomplished their goal in the mind of many Democratic supporters, which is that this whole thing was actually changed, the votes were changed,” The Hill media reporter Joe Concha said on “Tucker Carlson Tonight.” “Rod Rosenstein… the deputy attorney general said that not one vote had changed.”

Carlson and Concha expressed dismay that CNN and other media outlets reported on the now-debunked anti-Trump dossier when the information clearly had been unverified.

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Concha in particular took issue with Steele admitting he used “CNN’s iReport,” a “user-generated” website, for some information in his dossier.

“That is shocking to me. I can’t believe that isn’t getting more coverage,” Concha told Carlson.

The website appears to be deactivated.

Carlson said many media outlets helped spread false information to Americans by pushing the Russia collusion narrative with false information and openly wondered if they regretted their reporting.

“Do you think anyone in the press, at [CNN] or the others, will feel bad that they’ve been lying to their viewers for two years?” Carlson asked Concha.

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“I think many people have a problem with the media because there is no contrition,” Concha said, “that when mistakes are made, people don’t just say straight-up about excuses, ‘we got it wrong, we’re sorry, we’re going to try better next time.’ Think about the last time you ever heard that from any major media person.”

He cited a Monmouth University poll from last year in which 77 percent of Americans believed “fake news” happened at least occasionally, saying it helped prove the media had lost of the trust of many Americans.