Judge orders Roger Stone to court over inflammatory Instagram post

A federal judge on Tuesday ordered former Trump adviser Roger Stone to appear in court to consider whether his bail will be revoked after he posted a picture of her on Instagram showing what appeared to be crosshairs in the background.

U.S. District Judge Amy Berman Jackson ordered Stone to show up on Thursday afternoon to argue why she should not modify or revoke his bail -- or even impose a full gag order.

ROGER STONE APOLOGIZES AFTER SHARING JUDGE'S PHOTO, DENIES THREAT

Stone deleted the photo, but later posted the same one again, this time without the crosshairs, and slammed the trial in a caption.

“Through legal trickery Deep State hitman Robert Mueller has guaranteed that my upcoming show trial is before Judge Amy Berman Jackson, an Obama appointed Judge who dismissed the Benghazi charges against Hillary Clinton and incarcerated Paul Manafort prior to his conviction for any crime,” Stone’s post was captioned.

Stone and his lawyers filed a notice on Monday night, admitting that sharing the picture wasn’t appropriate and that he apologizes. His lawyer also said he plans to apologize in person Thursday.

“Please inform the Court that the photograph and comment today was improper and should not have been posted. I had no intention of disrespecting the Court and humbly apologize to the Court for the transgression,” Stone said.

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On Instagram, Stone said that the post has been “misinterpreted” and denied he tried to threaten the judge.

“A photo of Judge Jackson posted on my Instagram has been misinterpreted. This was a random photo taken from the Internet. Any inference that this was meant to somehow threaten the Judge or disrespect court is categorically false,” he wrote.

Stone pleaded not guilty last month to obstruction of justice, witness tampering and making false statements to Congress after being indicted last week as part of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia probe.

The indictment alleges that Stone worked to obstruct the House Intelligence Committee’s investigation into Russia interference in the 2016 election by making false statements to the committee, denying he had records sought by the committee and persuading a witness to provide false testimony.

The indictment does not charge Stone with conspiring with WikiLeaks, the anti-secrecy website that published Clinton campaign emails, or with Russian officers Mueller says hacked them. Instead, it accuses him of witness tampering, obstruction, and false statements about his interactions related to WikiLeaks.

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Jackson last week issued a limited gag order, preventing Stone from discussing the case near the courthouse -- but it does not stop Stone from making other public comments about the case.

In implementing the limited gag order on Friday, Jackson said it was necessary to "maintain the dignity and seriousness of the courthouse and these proceedings."

Fox News' Lukas Mikelionis, Lillian LeCroy, Brooke Singman and The Associated Press contributed to this report.