Joe Biden ‘runs a great risk’ if he avoids debates: Dan Henninger

'The president does indeed intend to go out and campaign hard and you can expect to see him in all of those battlegrounds states that he needs,' he says

Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden is running a great risk if he does not campaign in front of people or avoids debating President Trump, Wall Street Journal columnist Dan Henninger said Friday.

“The president does indeed intend to go out and campaign hard and you can expect to see him in all of those battlegrounds states that he needs like Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Nevada, Michigan and Florida,” Henninger told “America’s Newsroom.”

“The big question is whether Joe Biden is going to go out there and campaign out there on the campaign trail. I think he’s going to run a great risk at this point after the conventions if he does not get out there and campaign in front of groups of people or debate the president,” Henninger said.

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Meanwhile, many media outlets criticized the staging of the White House event where Trump accepted the Republican Party's renomination for president, citing concerns about its legality and the lack of social distancing.

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, the Republican National Convention was initially moved from Charlotte, N.C., to Jacksonville, Fla., before the idea of a four-day in-person extravaganza was scrapped due to a spike in cases across the Sun Belt. While part of the convention was still held in Charlotte, it was determined that Trump would give his speech on the fourth and final night at the White House.

A large stage was built on the South Lawn and approximately 1,800 people were in attendance. Critics were quick to express their disapproval that the White House would host such an openly political event.

Several journalists blasted the event for the lack of social distancing and minimal mask-wearing by attendees.

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Henninger said the Democratic and Republican conventions made “clear the distinct visions of the future of the United States.”

“Voters are going to have to make up their minds which party they are going with and it is going to be difficult, I think, for Democratically inclined voters to do so if their candidate spends most of the campaign in Delaware.”

Henninger went on to say, “I just don’t see them getting away with that.”

Fox News' Joseph A. Wulfsohn contribtued to this report.