PHOTOS: Edible Aphrodisiacs

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  • It may not sound sexy, but three courses of asparagus were served to 19th century bridegrooms due to its reputed aphrodisiacal powers.
  • Seasonal crops of figs were celebrated by ancient Greeks in a frenzied copulation ritual.
  • Sugar in its pure honey form can boost your energy, said FOXSexpert Yvonne Fulbright. Honey also fuels sperm cells.
  • Some oysters repeatedly change their sex from male to female and back, giving rise to claims that the oyster lets eaters experience the masculine and feminine sides of love.
  • Radishes were considered a divine aphrodisiac by the Egyptian pharoahs, most likely because of their spicy taste, which stimulates the palate.
  • Probably due to its rarity and musky aroma, truffles have long been believed to arouse the palate and the body. To sustain his masulinity, an ancient lover in lore was said to have gorged himself to death on Alba truffles during the wedding feast.
  • The Aztecs called the avocado tree "Ahuacuatl," or "testicle tree."
  • Chocolate contains both a sedative, which relaxes and lowers inhibitions, and a stimulant to increase activity and the desire for physical contact. It was actually banned from some monasteries centuries ago.
  • Liquor is known to help lovers feel relaxed and in the mood, and many believe it also boosts the libido. According to Fulbright, a study from the University of Missouri, Columbia, found subjects who strongly believed that alcohol ups sexual desire rated photos of the other gender as more attractive. Wine, however, has proven itself an aphrodisiac when it comes to scent. According to the sensual cookbook "Fork Me, Spoon Me," yeasty champagnes, dry Rieslings, and some chardonnays are said to replicate female pheromones. Cabernet sauvignons, earthy pinots and Bordeaux blends are said to replicate male pheromones.

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