Fox News - Fair & Balanced

Search Site

Phoenix Mars Lander

  • NASA/JPL-Caltech/U. Ariz./Imperial College London
  • AP/NASA, JPL-Caltech
  • NASA/JPL-Caltech/UA/Texas A&M
  • NASA/JPL-Caltech/U. of Ariz./Max Planck Institute
  • NASA/JPL-Caltech/U. of Ariz./Texas A&M
  • NASA/JPL/CalTech
  • NASA/JPL/CalTech
  • NASA/JPL/CalTech
  • NASA/JPL-Caltech/U. of Ariz./Texas A&M
  • NASA/Caltech/JPL/U. of Ariz./Max Planck Institute
  • NASA/JPL-Caltech/U. of Ariz./Texas A&M
  • NASA/JPL-Caltech/U. of Ariz./Max Planck Institute
  • NASA
  • NASA/JPL-Caltech/U. of Ariz./Texas A&M
  • NASA/JPL-Caltech/U. of Ariz.
  • NASA
  • NASA
  • NASA/JPL-Caltech/U. of Ariz./Texas A&M
  • NASA/Caltech/JPL/U. of Ariz./Max Planck Institute
  • NASA/JPL/Caltech/U. of Ariz.
  • NASA/JPL-Caltech/U. of Ariz./Texas A&M
  • NASA/JPL-Caltech/U. of Ariz./Texas A&M
  • NASA
  • NASA/JPL-Caltech/U. of Ariz./Texas A&M
  • NASA/JPL-Caltech/U. of Ariz./Texas A&M
  • NASA/JPL-Caltech/U. of Ariz./Texas A&M
  • NASA/JPL-Caltech/U. of Ariz.
  • NASA/JPL-Caltech/U. of Ariz.
  • NASA/JPL-Caltech/U. of Ariz.
  • NASA/JPL-Caltech/U. of Ariz.
  • NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona
  • NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona
  • NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona
  • NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona
  • NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona
  • NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona
  • NASA, JPL-Caltech, University of Arizona
  • NASA, JPL-Caltech, University of Arizona
  • NASA, JPL-Caltech, University of Arizona
  • NASA, JPL-Caltech, University of Arizona
  • AP
  • AP/Dean Knuth/Arizona Daily Star
  • AP
  • NASA
  • NASA/JPL/Corby Waste
  • NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona
  • NASA/JPL
  • NASA/JPL/Corby Waste
  • NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona
  • NASA/JPL
  • NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona
  • NASA/JPL
  • NASA/JPL-Caltech/UA/Lockheed Martin
  • NASA/JPL/Washington Univ./Univ. of Arizona
  • NASA
  • This image, about 2 millimeters across, from NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Optical Microscope shows particles collected on a magnetic surface inside the lander's microscope. The particles are larger grains seen within the fine orange dust that covers most of the ground at Phoenix's landing site. The particles vary in color, but are of similar size, about one-tenth of a millimeter.
  • The edge of a solar panel on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander in a trench on the surface of Mars, where a sample of soil was taken by the lander.
  • The lander's Surface Stereo Imager took this picture of Stone Soup trench on Sol 88.
  • June 29: This image taken by Phoenix's Robotic Arm Camera shows the trench known as 'Snow White 5.' The trench is about 1.5-to-1.9 inches (4-to-5 centimeters) deep, about 9 inches (24 centimeters) wide and 13 inches (33 centimeters) long. Snow White 5 is located in a patch of Martian soil near the center of a polygonal surface feature, nicknamed 'Cheshire Cat.' The digging site has been named 'Wonderland.'
  • This image provided by NASA shows the before, left, and after images of possible sublimation of ice in the trench informally called 'Dodo-Goldilocks' over the course of four days. The dice-size crumbs of bright material in the bottom left of the the trench in the left image taken June 15, 2008 have vanished from inside a trench where they were photographed, right image taken June 19, 2008 by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander, convincing scientists that the material was frozen water that vaporized after digging exposed it.
  • This image released by NASA and acquired by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander shows a new trench called 'Snow White,' in a patch of Martian soil near the center of a polygonal surface feature nicknamed 'Chesire Cat.' Excavation near Mars' north pole was halted Wednesday as engineers fixed a glitch on the Phoenix lander that caused the partial loss of science data.
  • This color image released by NASA and acquired by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager on Friday, June 13, 2008, shows one trench informally called 'Dodo-Goldilocks' after two digs on June 12, by Phoenix's Robotic Arm. Shallow trenches excavated by the lander's backhoe-like robotic arm have turned up specks and at times even stripes of mysterious white material mixed in with the clumpy, reddish dirt.
  • June 8: The two trenches dug by the Phoenix Mars Lander's robotic arm are shown on the surface of Mars. Soil from the right trench, informally called "Baby Bear," was delivered to Phoenix's Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer or TEGA, on June 6. The following several days included repeated attempts to shake the screen over TEGA's oven number 4 to get fine soil particles through the screen and into the oven for analysis.
  • June 9: The Phoenix Mars Lander uses its robotic arm during the mission's 15th Martian day since landing to test a 'sprinkle' method for delivering small samples of soil to instruments on the lander deck. Phoenix's first science experiment to heat the permafrost soil was delayed after it was discovered that virtually none of it passed through a screen to reach a miniature oven, one of eight aboard the spacecraft that will heat soil and sniff the resulting vapors for signs of life-friendly elements.
  • Material from the Martian surface captured by the Phoenix Mars Lander's robotic arm scoop.
  • June 6: This image shows a view from NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Stereo Surface Imager's left eye after delivery of soil to the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer (TEGA), taken on the 12th Martian day after landing (Sol 12, June 6, 2008). Soil is visible on both sides of the open doors of TEGA's No. 4 oven. Sensors inside the device indicate no soil passed through the screen and into the oven.
  • June 5: NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander scooped up this Martian soil on the mission's 11th Martian day, or sol, after landing (June 5, 2008) as the first soil sample for delivery to the laboratory on the lander deck. The material includes a light-toned clod possibly from crusted surface of the ground, similar in appearance to clods observed near a foot of the lander. This approximately true-color view of the contents of the scoop on the Robotic Arm comes from combining separate images taken by the Robotic Arm Camera on Sol 11, using illumination by red, green and blue light-emitting diodes on the camera. The scoop loaded with this sample was poised over an open sample-delivery door of Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer at the end of Sol 11, ready to be dumped into the instrument on the next sol.
  • June 6: This image provided by NASA shows Martian soil retrieved by the robotic arm of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander and released onto a screened opening of the lander's tiny testing oven. The soil failed to reach the instrument and scientists said Saturday they will devote a few days to trying to determine the cause.
  • June 5: This image released by NASA taken by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager shows the Robotic Arm scoop containing a soil sample poised over the partially open door of the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer's No. 4 cell, or oven.
  • June 3: A 3-millimeter- (0.12-inch-) diameter silicone target after being exposed to dust kicked up by the Phoenix probe landing on Mars. The mission's Optical Microscope observed particles that had fallen onto an exposed surface, revealing grains as small as one-tenth the diameter of a human hair. It is the highest resolution image of dust and sand ever acquired on Mars and is unprecedented in planetary exploration according to Michael Hecht of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif.
  • An image of Martian soil taken by the Phoenix Mars Lander.
  • A Martian landscape as seen by the Phoenix Mars Lander.
  • June 3: This photo provided by NASA shows the area where the Phoenix Mars Lander's robotic arm took a second scoop full of soil and revealed a whitish material at the bottom of the dig area informally called the 'Knave of Hearts.' The robotic arm's scraping blade left a small horizontal depression above where the sample was taken. The science team is debating whether this is a salt layer or the top of an ice table. The image was taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on the ninth day of the Mars mission, or Sol 9, (June 3, 2008) aboard the NASA Phoenix Mars Lander.
  • June 3: This image acquired by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's robotic arm camera shows material from the Martian surface captured by the robotic arm scoop. NASA's Phoenix lander begins long-awaited exploration of Mars' north pole region by clawing into the permafrost to search for evidence of the building blocks of life.
  • In this photo released by NASA Tuesday, June 3, 2008, a view from the Robotic Arm Camera on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander, shows partial opening of doors to one of the tiny ovens of the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer. Near the center of the image, the partial opening of a pair of doors reveals a screen over the opening where a soil sample will be delivered. The door to the right is fully opened and the one to the left is partially deployed.
  • The so-called 'Knave of Hearts' first-dig test area to the north of the lander on Sunday June 1, 2008. The Robotic Arm's scraping blade left a small horizontal depression above where the sample was taken.
  • Material from the Martian surface captured by the Robotic Arm (RA) scoop during its first test dig and dump. The test sample shown was taken from the digging area informally known as 'Knave of Hearts.'
  • May 31: What appears to be exposed ice underneath the Phoenix Mars Lander.
  • This approximate color (SSI's red, green, and blue filters: 600, 530, and 480 nanometers) view was obtained on sol 2 by the Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) on board the Phoenix lander. The view is toward the northwest, showing polygonal terrain near the lander and out to the horizon.
  • This image shows a polar projection mosaic of all data received as of the end of sol 2 from the right eye of the Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) instrument on board the Phoenix lander.
  • These images of three Phoenix color targets were taken on sols 1 and 2 by the Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) on board the Phoenix lander. The bottom target was imaged in approximate color (SSI's red, green, and blue filters: 600, 530, and 480 nanometers), while the others were imaged with an infrared filter (750 nanometers). All of them will be imaged many times over the mission to monitor the color calibration of the camera. The two at the top show grains 2 to 3 millimeters in size that were likely lifted to the Phoenix deck during landing. Each of the large color chips on each target contains a strong magnet to protect the interior material from Mars' magnetic dust.
  • An enhanced-color image provided by NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona from Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera shows the Phoenix landing area viewed from orbit. The spacecraft appears more blue than it would in reality. From top to bottom are the Phoenix lander with its solar panels deployed on the Martian surface, the heat shield and bounce mark the heat shield made on the Martian surface, and the top of the Phoenix parachute attached to the bottom of the back shell.
  • This image provided by NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona. shows the American flag and a mini-DVD on the Phoenix's deck, which is about 3 ft. above the Martian surface. The mini-DVD from the Planetary Society contains a message to future Martian explorers, science fiction stories and art inspired by the Red Planet, and the names of more than a quarter million Earthlings.
  • May 27: A view of the Martian surface from the Phoenix Mars Lander.
  • May 27: A view of the Martian horizon as seen by the Phoenix Mars Lander.
  • This Sunday May 25, 2008 photo provided by NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona, shows a polygonal pattern in the ground near NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. This is an approximate-color image taken shortly after landing Sunday by the spacecraft's Surface Stereo Imager, inferred from two color filters, a violet, 450-nanometer filter and an infrared, 750-nanometer filter.
  • This May 26, 2008 approximate-color image provided by NASA captured by the Phoenix Mars Lander shows the vast plains of the northern polar region of Mars. NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander spent its first full day in the Martian arctic plains checking its instruments in preparation for an ambitious digging mission to study whether the site could have once been habitable.
  • May 25: An image taken by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter showing the Phoenix Mars Lander descending on its parachute to the Martian surface.
  • This photo provided by NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona shows the surface of the northern polar region of Mars from NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander on Sunday, May 25, 2008.
  • Rocks in the Martian arctic, as seen by the Surface Stereo Imager Left on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander.
  • Another view of Martian arctic rocks, this time as seen by the Surface Stereo Imager Right on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander.
  • May 25: This image provided by NASA, JPL-Caltech and the University of Arizona shows a portion of the Martian surface seen from the Phoenix Mars Lander after it landed on the planet.
  • May 25: Part of one of the Phoenix Mars Lander's solar arrays.
  • May 25: A portion of the Martian landscape as seen from the Phoenix Mars Lander after it landed on the Red Planet.
  • May 25: A portion of the Phoenix Mars Lander and the Martian surface after the craft landed on the planet. The spacecraft touched down in the northern polar region of the planet after a 422-million-mile flight from Earth.
  • May 25: Control room members, from left, Barry Goldstein, Ed Sedivy and Peter Smith celebrate at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. as they get word that NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander landed safely on Mars near its north pole.
  • May 25: Chris Shinohara, Science Operations Center Manager, right, and Heather Enos, Project Manager for one of the landers' instruments, in red, cheer with others at the University of Arizona's Science Operations Center in Tucson, Ariz., as they hear the news that the Phoenix Mars Lander sucessfully landed.
  • May 25: Doug McCuiston, right, and Ed Sedivy hug in the control room at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., react as they see the first images from NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander after it landed safely on Mars near its north pole.
  • A graphic detailing the different components of the Phoenix Mars Lander.
  • An artist's impression of the Phoenix lander as the Martian winter approaches.
  • A computer rendition of the Phoenix lander soaking up solar power to generate electricity soon after it lands.
  • An artist's rendition of the Phoenix lander after a successful touchdown on Mars.
  • An artist's rendering of the Phoenix lander approaching the Martian surface.
  • An artist's concept of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander descending to the Martian surface via parachute.
  • NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander will enter the Martian atmosphere at hypersonic speeds. Friction will heat the forward-facing surface of the heat shield to a peak of about 1,420 degrees Celsius (2,600 degrees Fahrenheit) at an altitude of 41 kilometers (25.5 miles).
  • An computer rendition of Phoenix ablaze in the Martian atmosphere as it descends to the surface.
  • This still from a NASA computer animation depicts the Mars Phoenix Lander during its cruise to the red planet.
  • A labeled look at NASA's Mars Phoenix Lander.
  • The planned landing site for the Phoenix lander -- "D" on this global image -- is at a latitude equivalent to northern Alaska on Earth.
  • The Phoenix Mars Lander being placed inside its fairing at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.

FOX NEWS VIDEOS



ADVERTISEMENT

most active


ADVERTISEMENT