Dr. Janette Nesheiwat's July 4th dos and don'ts: Precautions will help keep friends, family safe

Little measures taken to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 can help keep you and your loved ones safe

As we celebrate Independence Day with friends and family, there are simple precautions all of us should take to keep coronavirus at bay.

Dr. Janette Nesheiwat offered some "dos and don'ts" Saturday on  "Fox & Friends Weekend."

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"First and foremost, we want to make sure that if we're outdoors and we’re not able to ... social distance, we want to wear a facial covering or a mask. That's really important," she said.

Nesheiwat stressed constant hand-washing and staying six to 10 feet away from people, including loved ones from other households.

"Remember," she said, "the virus likes to jump from one person to another."

A man watches fireworks after a baseball game between the Kansas City Royals and the Cleveland Indians on Wednesday, July 3, 2019, in Kansas City, Mo., the day before the Fourth of July. Cleveland won 4-0. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

A man watches fireworks after a baseball game between the Kansas City Royals and the Cleveland Indians on Wednesday, July 3, 2019, in Kansas City, Mo., the day before the Fourth of July. Cleveland won 4-0. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

Your health is very much at stake. According to data from the Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center, there are now almost 2.8 million confirmed COVID-19 cases in the United States and over 129,000 deaths.

"We’ve just learned that for every person [who] tests positive, there are 10 to 20 people [who] are undiagnosed," Nesheiwat said.

The Fox News medical contributor advised celebrating the Fourth at home with family and avoiding large crowds and clusters. Large groups serve as a breeding ground for the virus, which Nesheiwat said spreads through "talking, sneezing, coughing, shouting and cheering."

"It gets into the air and aerosolizes, and it gets into another person's eyes, nose, [and] their throat," she said.

People who have any symptoms or are not feeling well should stay home, preferably alone, to avoid infecting others.

Nesheiwat also urged people to avoid traveling to areas where there is a known oubreak, including parts of Arizona, Texas, Florida and California.

A recent surge in cases has many health experts worried, with at least five states setting single-day records for infections Friday.

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This comes after the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Director Dr. Anthony Fauci warned Tuesday that the number of new cases nationwide could soar to 100,000 per day  "if this does not turn around."

While the holiday weekend has the potential to be a perfect storm for spreading the virus, Nesheiwat said that won't happen if people stay vigilent by maintaining social distance, washing hands and wearing masks.

"All these little things together can help keep you safe and enjoy the holiday with your family and your friends," she said.