Mosquito-borne EEE kills another Massachusetts resident; man remembered for 'huge giving heart'

A 58-year-old Massachusetts man has died from the rare but serious mosquito-borne Eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) virus, according to his obituary.

Scott Mosman, of Taunton, died on Oct. 11. He passed about a month after he contracted the rare virus, The Boston Globe reported.

Mosman, who received an engineering degree and worked in environmental services, was “exceptionally strong and talented in all of his endeavors,” his obituary said.

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“Scott loved his family and friends while sharing his love of sailing, mountain biking, adventures, and animal,” it continues, adding his “many relatives and friends are a testament to Scott's love of people and his huge giving heart.”

Mosman “fought [the virus] like a son-of-a-gun,” his brother, Keith Mosman, told The Globe.

“He was a good guy, taken too young,” he added.

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Scott Mosman, 58, was "exceptionally strong and talented in all of his endeavors," his obituary reads.

Scott Mosman, 58, was "exceptionally strong and talented in all of his endeavors," his obituary reads. (Family handout)

The man’s passing appears to mark the fourth in the state this year from EEE, though the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (DPH) has not yet confirmed the death. The health agency announced the third death in a Sept. 26 news release. 

A spokesperson for the state’s DPH did not immediately return Fox News’ request for confirmation on Thursday.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) describes EEE as “one of a group of mosquito-transmitted viruses that can cause inflammation of the brain (encephalitis).”

Symptoms of the virus typically appear about four to 10 days after the bite, with severe cases progressing to encephalitis. Patients may experience high fever, stiff neck, severe headache and lack of energy. Approximately one-third of patients who contract EEE will die, and there is no specific treatment for the virus. Health officials said the only way to protect against the virus is to avoid being bitten by mosquitoes.

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It’s not clear where Mosman was bitten by an infected mosquito.

There have been at least 12 confirmed human cases of EEE in Massachusetts this year — a number that’s greater than the national average of five to 10 cases each year, per the CDC.

Dr. Catherine Brown, the Massachusetts state epidemiologist, recently explained why the state may be seeing more cases than normal this year.

Fox News' Alexandria Hein contributed to this report.