O.J. Simpson’s Twitter allegedly threatened parody account using knife emojis

O.J. Simpson’s Twitter account allegedly sent a series of menacing direct messages — including a string of 16 knife emojis and the warning that “I WILL FIND YOUR ASS AND CUT YOU” — to a parody account that skewers the disgraced football star over his acquittal in the 1994 slayings of ex-wife Nicole Brown Simpson and Ron Goldman.

The shocking threats were contained in a pair of videos posted on the “@KillerOJSimpson” Twitter page on Monday, which also marked the 25th anniversary of the infamous slow-speed police chase of a white Ford Bronco that ended with Simpson’s arrest on murder charges.

The videos show seven direct messages sent to @KillerOJSimpson, whose parody account features a crudely doctored profile photo of Simpson grinning while holding a butcher knife in a black-gloved hand.

Other content on the parody page includes a pinned tweet of a Father’s Day video that Simpson, 71, posted on Saturday — with added audio of someone repeatedly screaming “Police! Help!” in the background.

FILE: O.J. Simpson in the garden of his Las Vegas area home. 

FILE: O.J. Simpson in the garden of his Las Vegas area home.  (Didier J. Fabien via AP)

The videos posted by @KillerOJSimpson show that the messages it received came from Simpson’s “@TheRealOJ32” account, which he created last week.

The authenticity of the messages and the identity of who sent them couldn’t immediately be verified, and messages to the @KillerOJSimpson handle weren’t returned.

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In the first video posted by @KillerOJSimpson, a male narrator says, “Man, you would never guess who the hell just messaged me on Twitter in a DM. Look at this s–t.”

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A handheld camera then pans jerkily around a computer screen that shows an exchange of messages that begin with one from Simpson’s account demanding that the parody page be deleted over “false missleading (sic) content I didn’t post.”

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