Monica Lewinsky says Bill Clinton should want to apologize for infamous affair, says she's moved on regardless

Lewinsky is now the subject and producer of 'Impeachment: American Crime Story'

Monica Lewinsky got candid about her feelings toward Bill Clinton ahead of the premiere of the dramatization of their affair in "Impeachment: American Crime Story." 

The former White House intern found herself at the heart of an impeachment scandal and public ridicule in 1998 after a friend, Linda Tripp, released details of their affair to the public. Now, the story is coming to life by way of FX’s "American Crime Story" on which Lewinsky is both the subject and a producer.  

Speaking on the "Today" show Tuesday ahead of the series premiere, she explained that she’s nervous for the public to see some of her "cringeworthy," worst judgment calls brought to life.

"I’ve really worn two hats in this project, as a producer, I’m very proud of the project. But as a subject, I’m nervous," she told the host. "I’m nervous for people to see some of the worst moments of my life and a lot of behavior that I regret. If you remember your 20s, not that long ago, it’s pretty cringeworthy."

TRAILERS DROP FOR FX'S 'IMPEACHMENT' SERIES ABOUT CLINTON-LEWINSKY AFFAIR

Monica Lewinsky opened up about her thoughts on Bill Clinton years after their infamous affair.

Monica Lewinsky opened up about her thoughts on Bill Clinton years after their infamous affair. (Noam Galai/Getty Images for Webby Awards)

The show will go into intimate details about not only Clinton’s role in the situation from the power of the presidency but Lewinsky’s culpability in the affair that led to the public scandal and historical impeachment. She was asked directly if she carries any ill-will toward the former president or if she is still hoping for an apology from him. 

"I think there was a long period before my life changed in the last six or seven years where... I felt a lot in terms of there not being this resolution," she explained. "I’m very grateful that I don’t have this feeling anymore, I don’t need it."

MONICA LEWINSKY REVEALS HER ‘GREATEST REGRET’

However, she noted that "he should want to apologize" in the same way that anyone who hurts another person through their words or actions should want to make amends. 

Lewinsky concluded her thoughts on the scandal by noting that she believes, if the same scandal happened today in the age of social media, cancel culture and in a post-MeToo-awareness society, things would be different. However, she noted that it might not necessarily have been better for her. 

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR ENTERTAINMENT NEWSLETTER

"It’s not just people in power who have voices," she explained. "That’s one of the beauties and the beasts of social media. More people can be heard, so I might have had a little more support." 

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Lewinsky continued by saying that while her reputation was thrown to the wolves in 1998, the things that people believe would help her out today are also places where our society is "drowning in shame," which she plans to tackle in her upcoming documentary about public shaming. However, she’s currently focused on the premiere of "Impeachment: American Crime Story."