Kim Kardashian reflects on Alice Johnson case, how she was told going to the White House would ‘ruin’ career

Kim Kardashian is no stranger to political activism, having become more and more outspoken about issues like prison reform and gun violence over the last few years.

The reality star, 39, spoke with CR Fashion Book about her activism work and how she gravitated toward prison reform as a cause she's passionate about.

"My evolution on this is probably some combination of growing up, getting married, having kids and my life being so different than what it was when I was starting out," said Kardashian (via Too Fab). "Now, I feel like I have a duty to myself and to my children more than the public and I want to be a good role model for my kids."

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Kardashian reflected on the example she was setting for her children with husband, rapper Kanye West, and creating a better world for them by publicly fighting against unjust incarceration, such as that of  Alice Marie Johnson.

"I'm raising four black kids in this society and our system is so discriminatory against black and brown people. I want to do as much as I can to make their lives easier," Kardashian explained. "I never knew much about the system until I started to dig in, and once I learned and saw how many things were wrong, I really couldn't stop."

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In 2018, Kardashian lobbied President Donald Trump to grant freedom to Johnson, who was convicted for a first-time nonviolent drug offense and sentenced to life in prison, a sentence that many, including Kardashian, found unfair.

"Alice [Marie Johnson] is a mother of five and has siblings. I thought maybe Ivanka Trump would understand," noted Kardashian. "Through Ivanka and her husband, Jared, I was able to connect with the president."

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According to Kardashian, people around her warned that a visit with the president could have resulted in the end of her career.

"Everyone told me I would ruin my career if I went to the White House, but that doesn't mean anything to me. My reputation over someone's life? That didn't make any sense," she said. "People talk s--t all day long: I felt confident that I could handle a news story that would cycle for a day or a week, tops. But the chance to change someone's life? Backing out was not an option for me."

Kardashian also said that of all of her projects, she loves activism "the most."

Accompanying the interview was a photoshoot, in which Kardashian and fellow celebrity-activists Cher and Naomi Campbell dressed as bikers with their hair teased up in 1960s fashion.

Kardashian said on Instagram that the photos gave off "Priscilla Presley Vibes."

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Cher also spoke about her activism, which often manifests on Twitter, where she is very outspoken about her politics.

"I like Twitter because I like to say what I think and I don't have to worry about that kind of thing," said Cher, 73, a very vocal critic of the current political administration. "Sometimes I get my a-- kicked on Twitter, but I still speak my mind."

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Similarly, Campbell, 49, spoke about her work in fighting HIV, which was spurred by her friend Ray Petri's diagnosis and subsequent death.

"What struck me the most about his sickness, especially the end of it, was how poorly others treated him," said the model. "Since then, I've been a supporter of AIDS research and finding a cure. It's something I still fight for today. It's been nearly two and a half decades. I do believe that there is a cure."