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A look back at Colombia's 52-year-old civil war
With Colombia's government and the country's biggest rebel movement announcing an agreement on a historic peace deal. Here is how the conflict began and developed over the decades.
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FILE- This April 1948, file photo shows rioting and looting as a street car is overturned and burned during an uprising following the assassination of Jorge Eliecer Gaitan in Bogota, Colombia. The 1948 assassination of populist firebrand Jorge Eliecer Gaitan sparked the political bloodletting known as "La Violencia," or "The Violence." The Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia are preparing for a peace deal in Columbia's half-century guerrilla conflict which has roots in the assassination. (AP Photo/E. L. Almen, File)

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FILE- In this April 9, 1948, file photo, a mob quickly gathers in Bogota, Colombia after Jorge Eliecer Gaitan was shot. The 1948 assassination of populist firebrand Jorge Eliecer Gaitan sparked the political bloodletting known as "La Violencia," or "The Violence." The Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia are preparing for a peace deal in Colombia's half-century guerrilla conflict which has roots in the assassination. (AP Photo, File)

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FILE- In this April 9, 1948, file photo, Jorge Eliecer Gaitan lies dying in the Colombian Capital of Bogoto after being shot. Others are unidentified. The 1948 assassination of populist firebrand Jorge Eliecer Gaitan sparked the political bloodletting known as "La Violencia," or "The Violence." The Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia are preparing for a peace deal in Columbia's half-century guerrilla conflict which has roots in the assassination. (AP Photo, File)
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(COLOMBIA OUT) Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) guerrillas prepare weaponry inside their camp before leaving to set up road blockades February 28, 2002 in Caqueta jungle, Colombia. Peace talks with the Colombian government were suspended a week ago after the FARC hijacked a plane and kidnapped a senator. (Photo by Carlos Villalon/Getty Images)

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Manuel Marulanda, known as 'Tiro Fijo,' the man that started the FARC nearly fourty years ago, speaks to the media February 28, 2001 in Los Pozos, Colombia. The FARC (Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia), the country's largest rebel group, has been waging an insurgency against the government for decades at the cost of some 3,000 lives a year. (Photo by Carlos Villalon/Newsmakers)

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CHIQUINQUIRA - MAY 15: Elvia Cortes Gil de Pachon waits for a bomb-collar to be removed from her neck 15 May, 2000. The collar exploded killing the 55-year-old woman who with her husband refused to pay some 7,500 USD in extortion money to guerrillas from the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), military sources said. Three soldiers and one policeman attempting to help the woman were injured in the explosion the sources said. (Photo by EL TIEMPO/AFP/Getty Images)

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391317 03: A Colombian soldier recently released from a FARC detention camp meets his family June 28, 2001 at the Tolemaida military base in Colombia. Most of the freed soldiers were prisoners for almost three years and were released as gesture by the guerrilla group. (Photo by Carlos Villalon/Getty Images)
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384090 04: ***EXCLUSIVE*** A group of extreme right paramilitaries of the AUC, the United Self Defense Force of Colombia, walk trough a coca leaf plantation January 8, 2001 in the province of Putumayo, Colombia. Since the U.S. aid plan for Colombia began last December 15, the AUC are manually destroying coca leaves with machetes in and around the vast areas of coca leaf plantations south of Putumayo. The Colombian leftist guerrilla group, the FARC, is attempting to take control of areas that were under their control, not more than a year ago. (Photo by Piero Pomponi/Newsmakers)
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LOS POZOS, COLOMBIA: Colombian President Andres Pastrana (L) and the leader of the leftist Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) guerrillas, Manuel Marulanda, shake hands after signing a joint statement 09 February, 2001, in Los Pozos, Colombia, to revive the peace process and resume talks 14 February. The 13-point document, signed in front of reporters came after more than 13 hours of talks over two days between the two men and included a 'humanitarian agreement' to exchange imprisoned ill FARC prisoners for ailing police and military troops held hostage by the rebel group. AFP PHOTO/Luis ACOSTA (Photo credit should read LUIS ACOSTA/AFP/Getty Images)

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386544 36: (COLOMBIA OUT) A Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) guerrilla stands on a boat that will transport sugar cane to a factory that processes the cane into Panela, or pure sugar, February 23rd, 2001 on the Caguan river near Monteadentro, Colombia. This, the first enterprise to eradicate coca crops by substituting the sale of sugar for cocaine, is a joint effort of the river community and the guerrillas. (Photo by Carlos Villalon/Newsmakers)
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Commandant Salomon, chief of the United Self Defense Force of Colombia poses for a photograph May 6, 2001 in Barrancabermeja, Colombia. The AUC, as it is also known, has been engaged in fighting with the leftist group, FARC in this town for the past two months. Many civilians have died in the fighting, a result of death squads used by the AUC. Commandant Salomon has been accused of being responsible for the killings by the United States which has called his paramilitary force a terrorist group. (Photo by Piero Pomponi/Newsmakers)

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LA PLATA, COLOMBIA -JULY 12: A thirteen year-old girl from the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, FARC, is held captive by the Colombian military July 12, 2002 in La Plata, Colombia. After two days of combat, the Colombian army claimed to have killed thirty rebels and captured five. (Photo by Carlos Villalon/Getty Images)
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386544 43: (COLOMBIA OUT) Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) guerrillas rest after working at a sugar cane field February 23, 2001 in Monteadentro, Colombia. The guerrillas have made a joint effort with the community to eradicate coca crops by substituting the sale of cocaine for sugar. (Photo by Carlos Villalon/Newsmakers)
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(FILES) Undated picture taken at an undisclosed place and released on November 30, 2007 by the Colombian presidential press office, showing FARC hostage former presidential candidate Ingrid Betancourt, during her captivity. Colombian Defense Minister Juan Manuel Santos announced in a press conference on July 2, 2008 that Betancourt, three US nationals and 11 other hostages were released from their captivity by the Colombian Army. AFP PHOTO/HO (Photo credit should read HO/AFP/Getty Images)

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A Russian-made Mi-17 helicopter used in operation 'Jaque' (Check) to liberate from their FARC captors Ingrid Betancourt and three US citizens --among other hostages-- is on display at Bolivar Square in Bogota, on July 19, 2011 during Independence Day. AFP PHOTO/Luis Acosta (Photo credit should read LUIS ACOSTA/AFP/Getty Images)

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Colombia - JULY 2: In this handout from the U.S. Embassy, (L to R) Keith Stansell, Marc Gonsalves and Thomas Howes sit inside a plane after being rescued from a FARC base by the Colombian Army as U.S. Ambassador to Colombia William Brownfield speaks July 2, 2008 over Colombia. (Photo by U.S. Embassy via Getty Images)

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FILE - In this Sept. 23, 2015 file photo, Cuba's President Raul Castro, center, stands with Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos, left, and Commander the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia or FARC, Timoleon Jimenez , in Havana, Cuba. Negotiators for ColombiaĆ¢s government and leftist rebels are putting the final touches on a historic peace deal that they hope to announce in the coming hours. Several government negotiators told local news media on Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2016, that all major obstacles to a deal have been cleared up in around-the-clock sessions taking place in Cuba. (AP Photo/Desmond Boylan, File)
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Humberto de La Calle, right, head of Colombia's government peace negotiation team, shakes hands with Ivan Marquez, chief negotiator of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, left, while Cuban Foreign Minister Bruno Rodriguez, center, applauds after signing an agreement in Havana, Cuba, Wednesday, August 24, 2016. Colombia's government and the country's biggest rebel group reached a deal for ending a half-century of hostilities in what has been one of the world's longest-running armed conflicts. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
(Copyright 2016 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistribu)

A look back at Colombia's 52-year-old civil war

With Colombia's government and the country's biggest rebel movement announcing an agreement on a historic peace deal. Here is how the conflict began and developed over the decades.

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