GLOBAL ECONOMY

In Mexico, e-commerce has a long way to go to conquer street commerce
In Mexico City’s Tepito market, customers come looking for deals from fayuca sellers, shop-owners who sell bootleg DVDs and discount goods purchased in the U.S. and imported (many times through informal channels).
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Churros for sale outside a bag shop. (Photo: Nathaniel Parish Flannery/Fox News Latino)

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A police officer rides through Tepito's market. (Photo: Nathaniel Parish Flannery/Fox News Latino)

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Santiago Garcia a vender who sells soda, beer, and micheladas near one of the subway entrances in Tepito isn't worried about the growth of e-commerce in Mexico. His customers walk right by his cart every day. âPeople start buying around 2 pm,â he explained. (Photo: Nathaniel Parish Flannery/Fox News Latino)

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While Mexican internet users have started buying flights and reserving hotels online, most people still prefer to go to a store or market to buy clothing. (Photo: Nathaniel Parish Flannery/Fox News Latino)

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One of the major barriers to e-commerce in Mexico is the fact that only a third of the population uses bank accounts. To do business with a wide segment of the population companies have to find ways to let customers pay in cash. (Photo: Nathaniel Parish Flannery/Fox News Latino)

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Mexico City's Tepito market is nothing if not colorful. (Photo: Nathaniel Parish Flannery/Fox News Latino)

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Tessi Meneses says that sometimes she orders clothing online and has it sent to a cousin who lives in Manhattan. She doesn't trust Mexico's mail system. (Photo: Nathaniel Parish Flannery/Fox News Latino)

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Luxury department stores in Mexico offer goods from top brands but Tepito merchant Jesus Feliciano says that he thinks Amazon's entrance into Mexico could force luxury department stores to lower their prices. (Photo: Nathaniel Parish Flannery/Fox News Latino)

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In addition to low priced clothing Tepito's stalls also offer a large selection of bootleg DVDs for around the same price as a rental on Amazon.com. (Photo: Nathaniel Parish Flannery/Fox News Latino)

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Tepito is an informal economy in which many vendors sells from stands or carts on the sidewalk. Like online retailers Tepitos vendors don't invest in fancy showrooms and can offer lower prices to consumers. Here a Corona delivery van drops off boxes of beer at a store in Tepito and also lets a vendor buy a few more bottles for his cart. (Photo: Nathaniel Parish Flannery/Fox News Latino)

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Tepito vendor Jesus Feliciano says with department stores, traditional markets and online sales, Mexican customers now have "a buffet" of options. (Photo: Nathaniel Parish Flannery/Fox News Latino)

In Mexico, e-commerce has a long way to go to conquer street commerce

In Mexico City’s Tepito market, customers come looking for deals from fayuca sellers, shop-owners who sell bootleg DVDs and discount goods purchased in the U.S. and imported (many times through informal channels).

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