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Protesters in Mexico City mark 6-month anniversary of students' disappearance
Half a year after the disturbing disappearance of 43 young Mexicans in the town of Iguala in the state of Guerrero, there is still no consensus as to what exactly happened to them and people's anger lingers. And now relatives of the students and their supporters are demanding that June 7 elections in the state be postponed.
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Thousands gathered in Mexico City on Thursday to mark 6 months since the disappearance of 43 students in the town of Iguala, in the crime-ridden state Guerrero. Many other issues have come into play, such as government corruption. These protesters have the words, "It was the state" written over their mouths. (Photo: Diane Jeantet/Fox News Latino)

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People march to mark the six-month anniversary of the disappearance of 43 rural teachers college students, in Mexico City, Thursday, March 26, 2015. Angry citizens and parents of the 43 missing students urged the country not to abandon them. On Thursday, the Attorney General's Office issued a statement reiterating that the government had conducted a transparent and exhaustive investigation. Federal investigators say local police handed the students over to a drug gang, which killed them and incinerated their remains. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

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The government said in January that there was enough evidence to close the investigation into the studentsâ disappearance.Marches were organized in municipalities throughout the country, and many protesters traveled from afar to join the one in Mexico City. (Photo: Diane Jeantet/Fox News Latino)

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"Hasta la madre" is slang for âWe are fed up with you.â Calls for President Enrique Peña Nieto's resignation are commonplace among the demonstrators. (Photo: Diane Jeantet/Fox News Latino)

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The government says the 43 missing students were murdered by a criminal gang that burned their remains and dumped them in a river. Relatives refuse to accept the official version, however, and are asking that the case remain open. (Photo: Diane Jeantet/Fox News Latino)

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This sign reads, "We are missing 43." Six months after the student's disappearance, there is still no consensus as to what exactly happened to them. (Photo: Diane Jeantet/Fox News Latino)

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The students had set off on this journey for the commemoration of the 1968 Tlatelolco massacre â another bloody incident in Mexican history in which students were killed by members of the armed forces. (Photo: Diane Jeantet/Fox News Latino)

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President Enrique Peña Nietoâs popularity sank after the Iguala case. He was criticized for his handling of the case â for instance, he never went to the site of the students' disappearance. (Photo: Diane Jeantet/Fox News Latino)

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According to official 2014 data, more than 26,000 Mexicans are missing. A number of NGOs have been asking for years that the government take a more active approach to the issue. (Photo: Diane Jeantet/Fox News Latino)

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Police forces were present at Thursdayâs demonstration, but there was no altercations with protesters. (Photo: Diane Jeantet/Fox News Latino)

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âWe donât forgetâ was grafittied on the building of Excelsior, widely seen as a government-friendly newspaper. (Photo: Diane Jeantet/Fox News Latino)

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According to Mexicoâs newspaper of record, Reforma, the administrationâs approval rating is at a low 39%. (Photo: Diane Jeantet/Fox News Latino)

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People carry a banner with the image of Mexican revolutionary Emiliano Zapata during a march to commemorate the sixth month of the disappeared 43 rural college students, in Mexico City, Thursday, March 26, 2015. Angry citizens and parents of the 43 missing students marked the six-month anniversary of their disappearance with a march of a few thousand supporters Thursday, urging the country not to abandon them. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)

Protesters in Mexico City mark 6-month anniversary of students' disappearance

Half a year after the disturbing disappearance of 43 young Mexicans in the town of Iguala in the state of Guerrero, there is still no consensus as to what exactly happened to them and people's anger lingers. And now relatives of the students and their supporters are demanding that June 7 elections in the state be postponed.

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