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Mexico continues to smolder over 43 missing students
President Enrique Peña Nieto has criticized the incendiary tactics of the people demanding justice for the 43 missing students, but to the “normalista” protesters fire-bombings are a valid form of political expression.
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Iguala's mayor's office burns. The mayor has been accused of ordering the murder of three opponents in 2013 and the disappearance of 43 students in 2014.

(Nathaniel Parish Flannery)

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A citizen police officer holds up a shotgun in a small town near Acapulco on Guerrero's coast. Frustrated with the local, state, and federal governments' failure to provide law and order, citizens in many towns in Guerrero have formed community police patrols.

(Nathaniel Parish Flannery)

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Government offices in Chilpancingo after an attack by protesters.

(Nathaniel Parish Flannery)

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Police and army trucks are a common sight in Acapulco, a major tourist destination. In the hills on the outskirts of the city and in the small towns in the mountains police and army patrols are harder to find and residents complain about crime.

(Nathaniel Parish Flannery)

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Masked protesters carrying heavy wooden sticks march through Iguala.

 

(Nathaniel Parish Flannery)

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On November 8 protesters in Mexico City firebombed the entrance of the Palacio Nacional. The building contains murals by eminent Mexican muralist Diego Rivera that depict the history of colonial exploitation and class struggle in Mexico. 

(Nathaniel Parish Flannery)

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Protesters hold up a sign that says "We demand justice and security" in Iguala.

(Nathaniel Parish Flannery)

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A store sells caskets in Iguala. In 2013 Guerrero reported the highest number of homicides of any state in Mexico.

(Nathaniel Parish Flannery)

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A mural in Iguala optimistically announces that the mayor will "Transform Iguala" with "real actions." With his alleged role in the disappearance of the 43 students that promise has become a reality.

(Nathaniel Parish Flannery)

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Protesters smash the windows at the mayor's office in Iguala.

(Nathaniel Parish Flannery)

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A masked protester smashes a window at the mayor's office in Iguala.

(Nathaniel Parish Flannery)

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Two community police members sit at a guard station in a small town near Acapulco.

(Nathaniel Parish Flannery)

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Residents in Iguala watch the protest pass. Some complained about the destruction saying that the protesters would leave and they would left to pay for the damage.

(Nathaniel Parish Flannery)

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A window washer sprays soap onto a truck window in Iguala. More than eight out of every ten residents in Guerrero works in the informal sector. Through the window an Oxxo store is visible. Oxxo is owned by Coca-Cola FEMSA a Mexican multinational company that reported US$19.1 billion in revenues in 2013. 

(Nathaniel Parish Flannery)

Mexico continues to smolder over 43 missing students

President Enrique Peña Nieto has criticized the incendiary tactics of the people demanding justice for the 43 missing students, but to the “normalista” protesters fire-bombings are a valid form of political expression.

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