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Mexico searches for 43 missing students, finds dozens of – other – bodies
While bloody death tolls and ubiquitous violence are nothing new in a country that has seen an estimated 106,000 people killed in drug violence since 2006, the disappearance of 43 college students has shaken the country and spurred widespread protests across Mexico.  
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In this Oct. 22, 2014 photo, pepole protest the disappearance of 43 students in Mexico City. On Sept. 26, students from the Rural Normal School of Ayotzinapa traveled to Iguala to solicit donations, and there was a confrontation with police. Later, local police allegedly turned over the 43 missing students to members of the criminal gang Guerreros Unidos. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)

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People march holding posters with the images of missing students that read in Spanish "They took them alive," to protest the disappearance of 43 students from the Isidro Burgos rural teachers college in Mexico City, Wednesday, Oct. 22, 2014. Tens of thousands marched in Mexico City's main avenue demanding the return of the missing students. The Mexican government says it still does not know what happened to the young people after they were rounded up by local police in Iguala, a town in southern Mexico, and allegedly handed over to gunmen from a drug cartel Sept. 26, even though authorities have arrested 50 people allegedly involved. They include police officers and alleged members of the Guerreros Unidos cartel. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)

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FILE - In this Oct. 16, 2014 photo, a man places a missing persons' poster offering 1,000,000.00 Mexican pesos or about 74,000.00 U.S. dollars, leading to information on 43 college students who went missing, in Chilpancingo, Mexico. The families lives have been upended since police in the town of Iguala, allegedly on the mayors orders, attacked the students to stop them from interrupting a speech by the mayors wife on Sept. 26. Both the mayor and his wife are fugitives, along with the police chief. Three students and three bystanders died in the initial shootings. Investigators say the rest of the students were driven off to a police station, later turned over to the drug gang Guerreros Unidos and have not been heard from since. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)

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Mexican marines guard the road that leads to the site where an alleged clandestine mass grave was found near the city of Iguala, Mexico, Saturday Oct. 4, 2014. Mexican officials said a clandestine grave holding an undetermined number of bodies was found outside a town where violence last weekend resulted in six deaths and the disappearance of 43 students. (AP Photo/Alejandrino Gonzalez)

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A Mexican navy marine guards the road that leads to the site where an alleged clandestine mass grave was found near the city of Iguala, Mexico, Saturday Oct. 4, 2014. Mexican officials said a clandestine grave holding an undetermined number of bodies was found outside a town where violence last weekend resulted in six deaths and the disappearance of 43 students. (AP Photo/Alejandrino Gonzalez)

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People march holding posters with the images of missing students that read in Spanish "They took them alive," to protest the disappearance of 43 students from the Isidro Burgos rural teachers college in Mexico City, Wednesday, Oct. 22, 2014. Tens of thousands marched in Mexico City's main avenue demanding the return of the missing students. The Mexican government says it still does not know what happened to the young people after they were rounded up by local police in Iguala, a town in southern Mexico, and allegedly handed over to gunmen from a drug cartel Sept. 26, even though authorities have arrested 50 people allegedly involved. They include police officers and alleged members of the Guerreros Unidos cartel. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)

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A woman marches with leaflets with the images of missing students attached to her body, during a protest against the disappearance of 43 students from the Isidro Burgos rural teachers college, in Mexico City, Wednesday, Oct. 22, 2014. Tens of thousands marched in Mexico City's main avenue demanding the return of the missing students. The Mexican government says it still does not know what happened to the young people after they were rounded up by local police in Iguala, a town in southern Mexico, and allegedly handed over to gunmen from a drug cartel Sept. 26, even though authorities have arrested 50 people allegedly involved. They include police officers and alleged members of the Guerreros Unidos cartel. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)

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Demonstrators march in protest for the disappearance of 43 students from the Isidro Burgos rural teachers college, in Mexico City, Wednesday Oct. 22, 2014. The poster held by the protesters reads in Spanish "Mexicans when will you burn? When the disappeared are from your house?" Tens of thousands marched in Mexico City's main avenue demanding the return of the missing students. The Mexican government says it still does not know what happened to the young people after they were rounded up by local police in Iguala, a town in southern Mexico, and allegedly handed over to gunmen from a drug cartel Sept. 26, even though authorities have arrested 50 people allegedly involved. They include police officers and alleged members of the Guerreros Unidos cartel. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)

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FILE - In this Oct. 16, 2014 photo, a man places a missing persons' poster offering 1,000,000.00 Mexican pesos or about 74,000.00 U.S. dollars, leading to information on 43 college students who went missing, in Chilpancingo, Mexico. The families lives have been upended since police in the town of Iguala, allegedly on the mayors orders, attacked the students to stop them from interrupting a speech by the mayors wife on Sept. 26. Both the mayor and his wife are fugitives, along with the police chief. Three students and three bystanders died in the initial shootings. Investigators say the rest of the students were driven off to a police station, later turned over to the drug gang Guerreros Unidos and have not been heard from since. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)

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Masked demonstrators march with photographs of missing students and chant slogans to protest the disappearance of 43 students from the Isidro Burgos rural teachers college in Acapulco, Guerrero state, Mexico, Friday, Oct. 17, 2014. Investigators determined that 28 sets of human remains recovered from a mass grave discovered last weekend outside Iguala, in Guerrero state, were not those of any of the youths who haven't been seen since being confronted by police in Iguala on Sept. 26. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)

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Nick Casey, Alex Mooney

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In this Oct. 17, 2014 photo, Clemente Rodriguez Moreno, a father of a missing rural teachers college student, participates in a protest march demanding the safe return of 43 missing students, in Acapulco, Mexico. Sleep has eluded the 46-year-old father, since his 19-year-old son Christian disappeared with his college classmates on Sept. 26. When the days distractions of meals, meetings, marches end, parents of the missing are left with their thoughts, questions and a simmering rage. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)

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Mexican navy marines and officers belonging to the Attorney General's Office, guard the area where new clandestine mass graves were found near the town of La Joya, on the ouskisrts of Iguala, Mexico, Thursday Oct. 9, 2014. Two weeks after 43 students disappeared in a confrontation with police in rural southern Mexico, Attorney General Jesus Murillo Karam announced that suspects had led investigators to four new mass graves near the southern city of Iguala where authorities unearthed 28 badly burned bodies last weekend. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

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Mexican navy marines and officers belonging to the Attorney General's Office guard the area where new clandestine mass graves were found near the town of La Joya, on the ouskisrts of Iguala, Mexico, Thursday Oct. 9, 2014. Two weeks after 43 students disappeared in a confrontation with police in rural southern Mexico, Attorney General Jesus Murillo Karam announced that suspects had led investigators to four new mass graves near the southern city of Iguala where authorities unearthed 28 badly burned bodies last weekend. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

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Mexican navy marines guard the area where new clandestine mass graves were found near the town of La Joya, on the ouskisrts of Iguala, Mexico, Thursday Oct. 9, 2014. Two weeks after 43 students disappeared in a confrontation with police in rural southern Mexico, Attorney General Jesus Murillo Karam announced that suspects had led investigators to four new mass graves near the southern city of Iguala where authorities unearthed 28 badly burned bodies last weekend. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

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A woman places a candle on photos of the missing missing students during a protest against the disappearance of 43 students from the Isidro Burgos rural teachers college, in Mexico City, Wednesday, Oct. 22, 2014. Tens of thousands marched in Mexico City's main avenue demanding the return of the missing students. The Mexican government says it still does not know what happened to the young people after they were rounded up by local police in Iguala, a town in southern Mexico, and allegedly handed over to gunmen from a drug cartel Sept. 26, even though authorities have arrested 50 people allegedly involved. They include police officers and alleged members of the Guerreros Unidos cartel. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)

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Masked demonstrators march with photographs of missing students and chant slogans to protest the disappearance of 43 students from the Isidro Burgos rural teachers college in Acapulco, Guerrero state, Mexico, Friday, Oct. 17, 2014. Investigators determined that 28 sets of human remains recovered from a mass grave discovered outside Iguala, in Guerrero state, last weekend were not those of any of the youths who haven't been seen since being confronted by police in that city Sept. 26. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)

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In this Friday, Oct. 17, 2014 photo, demonstrators protest the disappearance of 43 students from the Isidro Burgos rural teachers college in Acapulco, Guerrero state, Mexico. Thousands of protesters marched along Acapulco's famed coastal boulevard Friday demanding the safe return of 43 missing students from a rural teachers college. The government is combing the hills of southern Guerrero state with horseback patrols and has divers looking in lakes and reservoirs behind dams, but has not found the youths missing since a confrontation with police Sept. 26 in the city of Iguala. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)

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Supporters of the Zapatista National Liberation Army (EZLN) stand during a protest in support of the 43 disappeared Mexican rural college students, at a main road near San Cristobal de las Casas, Mexico, Wednesday Oct. 22, 2014. The sign the man holds reads in Spanish "Life." Even after authorities have arrested 50 people allegedly involved that include police officers and alleged members of the Guerreros Unidos cartel, the Mexican government says it still does not know what happened last month to the young people after they were last seen taken by local police in Iguala, a town in southern Mexico, then later allegedly handed over to drug cartel gunmen. (AP Photo/Moyses Zuniga Santiago)

Mexico searches for 43 missing students, finds dozens of – other – bodies

While bloody death tolls and ubiquitous violence are nothing new in a country that has seen an estimated 106,000 people killed in drug violence since 2006, the disappearance of 43 college students has shaken the country and spurred widespread protests across Mexico.  

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