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Iguala residents take to the streets imploring: 'We want the students back alive!'
Ever since the disappearance of 43 students from the remote town of Iguala, Guerrero, the south-central Mexican state has been in turmoil, demanding justice and decrying state-sponsored corruption.   
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Carlos, a 28-year-old elementary school teacher said he joined the protest because “This is the only way to get the government’s attention. [The protest] is to show the government’s that we’re fed up." (Photo: Nathaniel Parish Flannery/Fox News Latino)

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A man carrying a machete walks along with several thousand protesters in the town of Iguala in the state of Guerrero in western Mexico. The protesters demanded information about the whereabouts of 43 students who were detained by municipal police on September 26. (Photo: Nathaniel Parish Flannery/Fox News Latino)

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Women hold up a sign showing the faces of the 43 missing students. (Photo: Nathaniel Parish Flannery/Fox News Latino)

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Two women look at photos posted in the main plaza of Chilpancingo, Guerrero's capital. In September when the police detained the students in Iguala they also killed 6 others. One student (shown in photo, image blurred) was found with his face sliced off and his eyes gouged out. (Photo: Nathaniel Parish Flannery/Fox News Latino)

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Fearing reprisal violence many protesters wore masks during the October 22 march through Iguala. (Photo: Nathaniel Parish Flannery/Fox News Latino)

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An indigenous woman walks along with protesters in Iguala. People from isolated, rural communities in Guerrero have long complained that the government doesn't provide them with basic public goods such as education and security. Nearly 8 out of every 10 public schools in Guerrero are not connected to the Internet and a fifth of the state’s schools lack electricity. (Photo: Nathaniel Parish Flannery/Fox News Latino)

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The front page of newspapers demand the resignation of the state's governor. In 2014 Guerrero reported the second highest number of homicides of any state in Mexico. On October 23, the day after the Iguala protest, Gov. Angel Aguirre resigned. (Photo: Nathaniel Parish Flannery)

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A small group of marchers wearing masks climbed utility poles to tear down political posters. Others spray-painted their own slogans on the walls. (Photo: Nathaniel Parish Flannery/Fox News Latino)

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A young man spray-paints the words, "Murderers of students" on the outer wall of the military base in Iguala. (Photo: Nathaniel Parish Flannery/Fox News Latino)

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Two masked protesters flee after spraying stenciled portraits of Gov. Aguirre and Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto and the words, "The murder of the students is a crime of the state, cynicism of the state." (Photo: Nathaniel Parish Flannery/Fox News Latino)

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"We are all Ayotzi" is an expression of solidarity with the missing students from the teacher's college of Ayotzinapa. (Photo: Nathaniel Parish Flannery/Fox News Latino)

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The mayor's office in Iguala, where two dozen masked protesters attacked the building, smashing its windows. (Photo: Nathaniel Parish Flannery/Fox News Latino)

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A man tries to break down the main security gate after protesters had set the mayor's office on fire. The message on his left reads "They will be judged for the crimes. We will be judged for our silence." (Photo: Nathaniel Parish Flannery/Fox News Latino)

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Members of the Union of Towns and Organizations of Guerrero State (UPOEG), the local citizen-police, are volunteering to help look for the students in mass graves found on the outskirts of the city. (Photo: Nathaniel Parish Flannery/Fox News Latino)

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Smoke rises from a municipal government building in Iguala, staining the Mexican flag painted on the entrance. The graffiti reads, "We want them alive." (Photo: Nathaniel Parish Flannery/Fox News Latino)

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Three quarter's of Guerrero's residents live in poverty. It's the third poorest state in Mexico. Eight out of ten residents work in informal jobs - washing car windows, selling tacos in the street, or in subsistence farming. Even so, looters in Iguala, like the kid carrying the printer, were scolded by protesters for stealing from the town hall. (Photo: Nathaniel Parish Flannery/Fox News Latino)

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As he watched a caravan of navy blue federal police trucks pass on a road on the outskirts of the city, Pedro, a middle-aged hunter who lives in Iguala, told FNL, “Right now the federal police are here but in two months they’ll be gone and the bad guys will chop us up into taco meat.” (Photo: Nathaniel Parish Flannery/Fox News Latino)

Iguala residents take to the streets imploring: 'We want the students back alive!'

Ever since the disappearance of 43 students from the remote town of Iguala, Guerrero, the south-central Mexican state has been in turmoil, demanding justice and decrying state-sponsored corruption.   

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