World

Adult And Underage Central American Migrants Face Deportation And Other Dangers In Mexico
It may be easy to get through the border from Guatemala to Mexico, but Central American migrants face extortion, violence and, yes, even deportation every step of their way north to the United States.
http://www.foxnews.com/">FoxNews.com
http://www.foxnews.com/

migrants

Carlos Ballesteros (left) was born in Honduras but grew up in the Bronx. After being deported in 2013, he was making his way towards the U.S. border last week with a group of Honduran migrants that includes two children at the Lechería rail stop north of Mexico City. (Photo: Nathaniel Parish Flannery/Fox News Latino)

train_approaches

A train pulls out of the Lechería railyard. Despite threats from organized crime and other violence that passengers must confront aboard trains, around a third of the Central American migrants who cross through Mexico ride the "La Bestia" freight train. (Photo: Nathaniel Parish Flannery/Fox News Latino)

scramble

After boarding the wrong train, Ballesteros and his travel companions leap off while the train leaves the station. (Photo: Nathaniel Parish Flannery/Fox News Latino)

border_patrol_2

A Mexican border patrol officer watches rafts cross the Suchiate River from Guatemala. Diana Martínez, the director of Mexican migration non-governmental organization, SinFronteras,said, "Right on the border there’s no fence. It’s easy to cross on rafts.” (Photo: Nathaniel Parish Flannery/Fox News Latino)
(Nathaniel Parish Flannery )

mx_view

Fernando, a 16-year-old skateboarder, says he comes to the skate park next to the railyard in Lechería every day. "I don't talk to the migrants too much. Mainly they just ask for money," he said. (Photo: Nathaniel Parish Flannery/Fox News Latino)
(Nathaniel Parish Flannery)

mural

A mural near the Lechería railyard reads, "Love and help the children." Residents, however, have a tense relationship with the migrants who pass through. (Photo: Nathaniel Parish Flannery/Fox News Latino)

Arriaga

A group of Central Americans rests in a migrant shelter across the street from the train station where "La Bestia" stops in Arriaga, Chiapas. Jade Figueroa, (third from left) a 29-year-old woman from Colón, Honduras, was detained and deported on her first two attempts to reach the United States, once in the U.S. and once in Mexico. She explained, “if I had the option to earn enough to get by [in Honduras] I’d stay.” (Photo: Nathaniel Parish Flannery/Fox News Latino)

Adult And Underage Central American Migrants Face Deportation And Other Dangers In Mexico

It may be easy to get through the border from Guatemala to Mexico, but Central American migrants face extortion, violence and, yes, even deportation every step of their way north to the United States.

More From Our Sponsors