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Latinos In America’s Breadbasket Can’t Escape Poverty
Hispanic immigrants in California's San Joaquin Valley, one of the richest agricultural regions in the world, are consistently ranked among the nation's most impoverished. 
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This photo taken Saturday June 1, 2013, in Fresno, Calif. shows farmworker Cristina Melendez posing with her seven children and one grandchild. A Mexico native who came to the U.S. at age 13, Melendez and the children have for years struggled with poverty in the San Joaquin Valley, one of the richest agricultural regions in the world. (AP Photo/Gosia Wozniacka)

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This photo taken Saturday June 1, 2013, in Fresno, Calif., shows farmworker Cristina Melendez smelling a mint plant with her 3-year-old daughter Claudia Yanely in her mother's garden. Melendez and her seven U.S. citizen children have for years struggled with poverty as she worked in the fields, following in her mother's footsteps, while Fresno's farmers prospered. (AP Photo/Gosia Wozniacka)

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This photo taken Saturday June 1, 2013, in Fresno, Calif. shows farmworker Cristina Melendez, 36, and her mother Maria Rosales, 60, working on the vegetable garden outside the mother's apartment. Rosales, now a U.S. citizen, brought Melendez to work in California's fields when the girl was 13, hoping farm work would be a spring board to a better life, but Melendez and two of her oldest sons have yet to find a way out of the fields and out of the cycle of poverty in which the family has been stuck for generations. (AP Photo/Gosia Wozniacka)

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This photo taken Saturday June 1, 2013, in Fresno, Calif. shows farmworker Cristina Melendez posing for a photo in front of her mother's apartment. A Mexico native who came to the U.S. at age 13, Melendez and her seven U.S. citizen children have for years struggled with poverty in the San Joaquin Valley, one of the richest agricultural regions in the world. (AP Photo/Gosia Wozniacka)

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This photo taken Saturday June 1, 2013, in Fresno, Calif. shows farmworker Cristina Melendez sitting in front of her mother's apartment, as her 5-year-old daughter Lupita Yarelin cries. Melendez, a Mexico native, and her seven U.S. citizen children have for years struggled with poverty, but without legal status, Melendez canât file for unemployment when there's no work in the fields and only obtains food stamps for her kids. (AP Photo/Gosia Wozniacka)
(AP2013)

Latinos In America’s Breadbasket Can’t Escape Poverty

Hispanic immigrants in California's San Joaquin Valley, one of the richest agricultural regions in the world, are consistently ranked among the nation's most impoverished. 

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