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Maduro Sends In Venezuelan Military Into Slums
In an effort to fight an astounding rise in crime, Venezulan President Nicolás Maduro has sent in military forces into the country's slums.
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In this May 14, 2013 photo, National Guard soldiers patrol as part of the "Secure Homeland" initiative in Petare, one of the most dangerous neighborhoods of Caracas, Venezuela. The initiative started in the Caracas area on Monday and will be expanded to the states of Zulia, Lara and Carabobo next week. Human rights activists worry that sending soldiers trained for warfare on policing missions will only make things worse for the residents they are meant to protect. (AP Photo/Ariana Cubillos)

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In this May 14, 2013 photo, National Guard soldiers patrol on motorcycles as part of the "Secure Homeland" initiative in Petare, one of the most dangerous neighborhoods of Caracas, Venezuela. With some 15,000 killings a year, Venezuelas homicide rate is the fifth highest in the world, according to U.N. statistics. Critics dismiss the "Secure Homeland" initiative as a political charade that risks degenerating into human rights abuses while having no lasting impact on crime. But to many residents, weary of being terrorized by armed gangs, seeing troops on the streets is a welcome projection of government power. (AP Photo/Ariana Cubillos)

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In this May 14, 2013 photo, a National Guard soldier stands guard on a street near a checkpoint that is part of the "Secure Homeland" initiative in Petare, one of the most dangerous neighborhoods of Caracas, Venezuela. Dozens of military checkpoints have been set up in the most dangerous parts of Venezuela's capital, in the government's latest attempt to control the oil-rich country's pandemic of violence. Critics dismiss the "Secure Homeland" initiative as a political charade that risks degenerating into human rights abuses while having no lasting impact on crime. But to many residents, weary of being terrorized by armed gangs, seeing troops on the streets is a welcome projection of government power. (AP Photo/Ariana Cubillos)

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In this May 14, 2013 photo, a National Guard soldier checks a driver's vehicle documents at a checkpoint that is part of the "Secure Homeland" initiative in Petare, one of the most dangerous neighborhoods of Caracas, Venezuela. Critics dismiss the "Secure Homeland" initiative as a political charade that risks degenerating into human rights abuses while having no lasting impact on crime. But to many residents, weary of being terrorized by armed gangs, seeing troops on the streets is a welcome projection of government power. (AP Photo/Ariana Cubillos)

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Map locates Petare, Caracas.

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In this May 14, 2013 photo, Gen. Antonio Benavides, left, gives instructions to a soldiers during a security operation that is part of the "Secure Homeland" initiative in Petare, one of the most dangerous neighborhoods of Caracas, Venezuela. The murder rate doubled during the 14-year-rule of the late President Hugo Chavez as cheap access to guns and an ineffective justice system fed a culture of violence in slums like Petare, parts of which have become no-go zones for outsiders, including police. (AP Photo/Ariana Cubillos)
(AP2013)

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In this May 14, 2013 photo, a National Guard soldier frisks a man outside his car at a checkpoint that is part of the "Secure Homeland" initiative in Petare, one of the most dangerous neighborhoods of Caracas, Venezuela. Since Monday, this scene is playing out day and night at dozens of military checkpoints set up here in the socialist government's latest attempt to control the oil-rich countrys pandemic of violence. (AP Photo/Ariana Cubillos)

Maduro Sends In Venezuelan Military Into Slums

In an effort to fight an astounding rise in crime, Venezulan President Nicolás Maduro has sent in military forces into the country's slums.

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