World

Brazil Drug Dealers Say No to Crack in Rio
The drug bosses, often born and raised in the very slums they now lord over, say crack destabilizes their communities, making it harder to control areas long abandoned by the government.

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In this Aug. 7, 2012 photo, a man smokes crack in the Manguinhos slum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Some drug bosses say they have stopped selling crack because it destabilizes their communities, making it harder to control areas long abandoned by the government. City authorities take credit for the change, arguing that drug gangs are trying to create a distraction and make police back off their offensive to take back the slums. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
(AP2012)

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In this Aug. 12, 2012 photo, a crack user leaves a crack house near the Manguinhos slum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Some drug bosses say they have stopped selling crack because it destabilizes their communities, making it harder to control areas long abandoned by the government. City authorities take credit for the change, arguing that drug gangs are trying to create a distraction and make police back off their offensive to take back the slums. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
(AP2012)

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ADVANCE FOR USE SUNDAY, AUG. 19 AND THEREAFTER - In this Aug. 8, 2012 photo, armed drug traffickers pose for a photo with their backs to the camera in the Antares slum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Some drug bosses say they have stopped selling crack because it destabilizes their communities, making it harder to control areas long abandoned by the government. City authorities take credit for the change, arguing that drug gangs are trying to create a distraction and make police back off their offensive to take back the slums. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

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In this Aug. 11, 2012 photo, a masked and armed trafficker poses for a photo at a drug selling point that no longer sells crack in the Mandela slum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Some drug bosses say they have stopped selling crack because it destabilizes their communities, making it harder to control areas long abandoned by the government. City authorities take credit for the change, arguing that drug gangs are trying to create a distraction and make police back off their offensive to take back the slums. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
(AP2012)

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In this Aug. 11, 2012 photo, a trafficker test fires a riffle in the Mandela slum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Some drug bosses say they have stopped selling crack because it destabilizes their communities, making it harder to control areas long abandoned by the government. City authorities take credit for the change, arguing that drug gangs are trying to create a distraction and make police back off their offensive to take back the slums. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
(AP2012)

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In this Aug. 7, 2012 photo, Natalia Gonzales, a 15-year-old crack user, poses for a portrait in an area known as "Crackland" in the Manguinhos slum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Some drug bosses say they have stopped selling crack because it destabilizes their communities, making it harder to control areas long abandoned by the government. City authorities take credit for the change, arguing that drug gangs are trying to create a distraction and make police back off their offensive to take back the slums. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
(AP2012)

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In this Aug. 7, 2012 photo, people gather in an area known as "Crackland" inside the Manguinhos slum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Some drug bosses say they have stopped selling crack because it destabilizes their communities, making it harder to control areas long abandoned by the government. City authorities take credit for the change, arguing that drug gangs are trying to create a distraction and make police back off their offensive to take back the slums. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

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In this Aug. 8, 2012 photo, Flavia Froes, left, a lawyer who heads the NGO Anjos da Libertade talks with a drug seller in the Antares slum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Some drug bosses say they have stopped selling crack because it destabilizes their communities, making it harder to control areas long abandoned by the government. City authorities take credit for the change, arguing that drug gangs are trying to create a distraction and make police back off their offensive to take back the slums. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

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In this Aug. 8, 2012 photo, traffickers sell drugs in the Antares slum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Some drug bosses say they have stopped selling crack because it destabilizes their communities, making it harder to control areas long abandoned by the government. City authorities take credit for the change, arguing that drug gangs are trying to create a distraction and make police back off their offensive to take back the slums. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

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ADVANCE FOR USE SUNDAY, AUG. 19 AND THEREAFTER - In this Aug. 8, 2012 photo, traffickers and users gather at a drug selling point in the Antares slum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Some drug bosses say they have stopped selling crack because it destabilizes their communities, making it harder to control areas long abandoned by the government. City authorities take credit for the change, arguing that drug gangs are trying to create a distraction and make police back off their offensive to take back the slums. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
(AP2012)

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In this Aug. 8, 2012 photo, crack users gather under a bridge in the Antares slum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Some drug bosses say they have stopped selling crack because it destabilizes their communities, making it harder to control areas long abandoned by the government. City authorities take credit for the change, arguing that drug gangs are trying to create a distraction and make police back off their offensive to take back the slums. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
(AP2012)

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In this Aug. 11, 2012 photo, a trafficker stands at a drug selling point that stopped selling crack in the Mandela slum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Some drug bosses say they have stopped selling crack because it destabilizes their communities, making it harder to control areas long abandoned by the government. City authorities take credit for the change, arguing that drug gangs are trying to create a distraction and make police back off their offensive to take back the slums. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
(AP2012)

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In this Aug. 8, 2012 photo, traffickers sell drugs in the Antares slum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Some drug bosses say they have stopped selling crack because it destabilizes their communities, making it harder to control areas long abandoned by the government. City authorities take credit for the change, arguing that drug gangs are trying to create a distraction and make police back off their offensive to take back the slums. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

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In this Aug. 12, 2012 photo, a man smokes crack near the Manguinhos slum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Some drug bosses say they have stopped selling crack because it destabilizes their communities, making it harder to control areas long abandoned by the government. City authorities take credit for the change, arguing that drug gangs are trying to create a distraction and make police back off their offensive to take back the slums. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
(AP2012)

Brazil Drug Dealers Say No to Crack in Rio

The drug bosses, often born and raised in the very slums they now lord over, say crack destabilizes their communities, making it harder to control areas long abandoned by the government.

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