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Cuba's Elderly Population Tests Economic Reform
Cuba's labor force is shrinking just when President Raúl Castro's government is struggling to implement reforms that aim to resuscitate an economy long on life support.

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In this picture taken Aug 1, 2012, Rafael Vega, 84, holds the paperback cover of a Cuban history book that he uses to fan himself, at a senior center, that provides retirees with medical attention, meals and social activities, in Havana, Cuba. Cuba grapples with having the oldest citizenry in Latin America, a phenomenon fueled by low birth rates and long life expectancies, plus the migration of young people and women. The government has already postponed the retirement age and is trying to create more homes and programs for the elderly, but still will have to handle the economic consequences of its increasingly graying population.(AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

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In this picture taken Aug. 2, 2012, Emelia Moreno, 75, a divorced, retired cashier, holds a portrait of her only child, in Havana, Cuba. Moreno, whose daughter left for the United States a decade ago, knows that one day she'll be completely dependent on a Cuban government that is finding it ever harder to care for its burgeoning population of elderly. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

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In this picture taken Aug. 2, 2012, Emelia Moreno, 75, a divorced, retired cashier, poses with a portrait of her only child, in Havana, Cuba. Moreno, whose daughter left for the United States a decade ago, knows that one day she'll be completely dependent on a Cuban government that is finding it ever harder to care for its burgeoning population of elderly. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

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In this picture taken Aug 2, 2012, women dance at a senior center, that provides retirees with medical attention, meals and social activities, in Havana, Cuba. Cuba grapples with having the oldest citizenry in Latin America, a phenomenon fueled by low birth rates and long life expectancies, plus the migration of young people and women. The government has already postponed the retirement age and is trying to create more homes and programs for the elderly, but still will have to handle the economic consequences of its increasingly graying population.(AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

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In this picture taken Aug 1, 2012, a child visits with his grandmother at a senior center, that provides retirees with medical attention, meals and social activities, in Havana, Cuba. Cuba grapples with having the oldest citizenry in Latin America, a phenomenon fueled by low birth rates and long life expectancies, plus the migration of young people and women. The government has already postponed the retirement age and is trying to create more homes and programs for the elderly, but still will have to handle the economic consequences of its increasingly graying population.(AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

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In this picture taken Aug 2, 2012, a couple dances at a senior center, that provides retirees with medical attention, meals and social activities, in Havana, Cuba. Cuba grapples with having the oldest citizenry in Latin America, a phenomenon fueled by low birth rates and long life expectancies, plus the migration of young people and women. The government has already postponed the retirement age and is trying to create more homes and programs for the elderly, but still will have to handle the economic consequences of its increasingly graying population.(AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

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Retired taxi driver Jose Miguel, 69, carries one of his dogs to hand to a tourist in old Havana, Cuba, Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2012. To supplement his pension Jose Miguel photographs tourists with his dogs. Cuba grapples with having the oldest citizenry in Latin America, a phenomenon fueled by low birth rates and long life expectancies, plus the migration of young people and women. The government has already postponed the retirement age and is trying to create more homes and programs for the elderly, but still will have to handle the economic consequences of its increasingly graying population.(AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
(AP2012)

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In this picture taken July 6, 2012, Rogelio Alonso, 74, center, plows a piece of land using a pair of oxen in Los Palos, Cuba. Cuba grapples with having the oldest citizenry in Latin America, a phenomenon fueled by low birth rates and long life expectancies, plus the migration of young people and women. The government has already postponed the retirement age and is trying to create more homes and programs for the elderly, but still will have to handle the economic consequences of its increasingly graying population. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

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In this picture taken Aug 2, 2012, women exercise at a senior center, that provides retirees with medical attention, meals and social activities, in Havana, Cuba. Cuba grapples with having the oldest citizenry in Latin America, a phenomenon fueled by low birth rates and long life expectancies, plus the migration of young people and women. The government has already postponed the retirement age and is trying to create more homes and programs for the elderly, but still will have to handle the economic consequences of its increasingly graying population.(AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
(AP2012)

Cuba's Elderly Population Tests Economic Reform

Cuba's labor force is shrinking just when President Raúl Castro's government is struggling to implement reforms that aim to resuscitate an economy long on life support.

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