World

Trapped in Mexico
Thousands of children without Mexican citizenship now find themselves without access to basic services in Mexico.

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In this Tuesday, July 10, 2012 photo, U.S. born children watch as other families try to get their children's U.S. birth certificate stamped by Mexican authorities in Malinalco, Mexico. Because of the Byzantine rules of Mexican and U.S. bureaucracies, tens of thousands of U.S. born children of Mexican migrant parents now find themselves without access to basic services in Mexico - unable to officially register in school or sign up for health care at public hospitals and clinics that give free check-ups and medicines. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)

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In this Tuesday, July 10, 2012 photo, Rogelio Hernandez Medina, 7, examines his U.S. passport as he waits with his father to get his U.S. birth certificate stamped by Mexican authorities in Malinalco, Mexico. Because of the Byzantine rules of Mexican and U.S. bureaucracies, tens of thousands of U.S. born children of Mexican migrant parents now find themselves without access to basic services in Mexico - unable to officially register in school or sign up for health care at public hospitals and clinics that give free check-ups and medicines. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)

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In this Tuesday, July 10, 2012 photo, Maria del Rosario Leyva, left, who returned with her 3-year-old boy and a 5-year-old girl from Santa Ana, California last year after their father, Marco Antonio Iglesias, right, was deported, try to get their children's U.S. birth certificates stamped by Mexican authorities in Malinalco, Mexico. Because of the Byzantine rules of Mexican and U.S. bureaucracies, tens of thousands of U.S. born children of Mexican migrant parents now find themselves without access to basic services in Mexico - unable to officially register in school or sign up for health care at public hospitals and clinics that give free check-ups and medicines. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)

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In this Tuesday, July 10, 2012, Rogelio Hernandez Sanchez, 34, second from left, and his son, Rogelio Hernandez Medina, 7, left, listen to Ellen Calmus, right, a coordinator of the "Proyecto El Rincon" or "The Corner Project", a local non-profit organization for migrant families, as he tries to get his son's U.S. birth certificate stamped by Mexican authorities in Malinalco, Mexico. Because of the Byzantine rules of Mexican and U.S. bureaucracies, tens of thousands of U.S. born children of Mexican migrant parents now find themselves without access to basic services in Mexico - unable to officially register in school or sign up for health care at public hospitals and clinics that give free check-ups and medicines.(AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)

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In this Tuesday, July 10, 2012 photo, parents wait to try to get their children's U.S. birth certificate stamped by Mexican authorities in Malinalco, Mexico. Because of the Byzantine rules of Mexican and U.S. bureaucracies, tens of thousands of U.S. born children of Mexican migrant parents now find themselves without access to basic services in Mexico - unable to officially register in school or sign up for health care at public hospitals and clinics that give free check-ups and medicines. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)

Trapped in Mexico

Thousands of children without Mexican citizenship now find themselves without access to basic services in Mexico.

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