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Remembering Flight 587, 10 Years Later
Flight 587 was the second worst aviation disaster in U.S. history, but remains a forgotten tragedy. 
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397324 01: The wreckage of American Airlines flight 587 burns November 12, 2001 in the Rockaway neighborhood of the Queens section of New York City, The Airbus A-300 passenger jet crashed shortly after takeoff, killing all 260 people on board and five people on the ground. (Photo by NYPD/Getty Images)

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397181 03: (PUERTO RICO OUT) Forty-nine-year old Ana Rosa Hierro (C) is escorted out of the Jose Francisco Pena Gomez Airport November 12, 2001 in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic after learning her three-year-old grand daughter was aboard American Airlines flight 587 that crashed in Queens, New York early this morning minutes after departing from John F. Kennedy Airport. (Photo by Jose Jimenez/Getty Images)

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397168 03: Police stand guard in front of the engine from American Airlines Flight 587 that crashed November 12, 2001 in Rockaway Beach, New York City. The plane carrying 255 people crashed in a nosedive after taking off from John F. Kennedy International Airport, plowing through nearby homes. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

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397168 08: A New York City Police Officer wears a mask to protect him from the smoke near the scene where American Airlines Flight 587 crashed November 12, 2001 in Rockaway Beach, New York City. The plane carrying 255 people crashed in a nosedive after taking off from John F. Kennedy International Airport, plowing through nearby homes. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

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397179 03: A house damaged by the crash of American Airlines flight 587 stands November 12, 2001 in Rockaway Beach, New York City. The plane carrying 255 people crashed in a nosedive after taking off from John F. Kennedy International Airport, plowing through nearby homes. (Photo by George De Sota/Getty Images)

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397512 07: This undated National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) handout photo shows attachment points of the tail fin from American Airlines flight 587, at the crash site in the Belle Harbor neighborhood in the Queens borough of New York. The American Airlines flight, destined for the Dominican Republic, crashed shortly after take-off Monday from New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport, killing all 260 people on board and up to five people on the ground. (Photo by Getty Images)

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397512 06: This undated National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) handout photo shows attachment points of the tail fin from American Airlines flight 587, at the crash site in the Belle Harbor neighborhood in the Queens borough of New York. The American Airlines flight, destined for the Dominican Republic, crashed shortly after take-off Monday from New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport, killing all 260 people on board and up to five people on the ground. (Photo by Getty Images)

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397512 05: This undated National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) handout photo shows attachment points of the tail fin from American Airlines flight 587, at the crash site in the Belle Harbor neighborhood in the Queens borough of New York. The American Airlines flight, destined for the Dominican Republic, crashed shortly after take-off Monday from New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport, killing all 260 people on board and up to five people on the ground. (Photo by Getty Images)

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397196 02: The wrecked tail from American Airline flight 587 is lifted out of Jamaica Bay November 12, 2001 in Far Rockaway, New York City. The plane with 255 people on board crashed into the Queens neighborhood of Rockaway Beach. Six people on the ground are reported as missing. (Photo by Anthony Correia/Getty Images)

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397290 02: NEW YORK NEWSPAPERS OUT Engine no. 2 of American Airline Flight 587 is loaded up to be removed November 14, 2001 in the Belle Harbor section of the Queens borough of New York. The engine fell from the aircraft shortly before flight 587 crashed into the Queens neighborhood Monday after taking off from John F. Kennedy Airport. (Photo by Robert Mecea/Getty Images)

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397204 06: Grievers hold Dominican and American flags after a service for family members of the victims of the American Airlines Flight 587 crash November 12, 2001 in the Washington Heights section of New York City. Washington Heights contains the largest community of Dominicans in the United States. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

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397237 02: An investigator examines the wreckage of American Airlines flight 587 among destroyed houses November 13, 2001 in the Rockaway section of Queens, New York. Mechanical failure was the most likely cause of the crash, which killed all 260 people onboard, but sabotage could not be completely ruled out, investigators said. (Photo by Shaul Schwarz/Getty Images)

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397237 03: Wreckage of American Airlines flight 587 lays scattered among destroyed houses November 13, 2001 in the Rockaway section of Queens, New York. Mechanical failure was the most likely cause of the crash, which killed all 260 people onboard, but sabotage could not be completely ruled out, investigators said. (Photo by Shaul Schwarz/Getty Images)

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397290 03: NEW YORK NEWSPAPERS OUT Fan blades from engine no. 2 of American Airline Flight 587 is visible November 14, 2001 in the Belle Harbor section of the Queens borough of New York. The engine fell from the aircraft and landed in the back yard of a house shortly before flight 587 crashed into the Queens neighborhood Monday after taking off from John F. Kennedy Airport. (Photo by Robert Mecea/Getty Images)

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405008 01: Marion Blakey, on ladder, head of the National Transportation Safety Board, and Sean O''Keefe, NASA Administrator, next to ladder, look over the tail section of American Airlines Flight 587 at the NASA Langley Research Center May 3, 2002 in Hampton, VA. Langley is doing research on the composite tail section to help the NTSB in their investigation of the crash. (Photo by NASA/Langley Research Center/Getty Images)

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WASHINGTON - OCTOBER 26: Victims' family members of the crash of American Airlines flight 587 Olivia Ortiz (L) and Ana Zabala (C) cry during a meeting to unveil findings of the investigation of the accident at the National Transportation Safety Board headquarters October 26, 2004 in Washington, DC. Findings in the November 2001crash that killed all 260 people aboard and 5 on the ground was caused mainly by pilot error. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
(2004 Getty Images)

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WASHINGTON - OCTOBER 26: Karen Tavarez (L), whose mother and nephew were killed at the crash of American Airlines flight 587 is comforted by her sister Cindy (R) during a meeting to unveil findings of the investigation of the accident at the National Transportation Safety Board headquarters October 26, 2004 in Washington, DC. Findings in the November 2001crash that killed all 260 people aboard and 5 on the ground was caused mainly by pilot error. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
(2004 Getty Images)

Remembering Flight 587, 10 Years Later

Flight 587 was the second worst aviation disaster in U.S. history, but remains a forgotten tragedy. 

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