World

In Booming Brazil, Crackland Thrives
About two decades after the U.S. emerged from the worst of its own crack epidemic, Brazilian authorities are watching the cheap drug spread across this country of 190 million people. 
">

Brazil_Combats_Crack_9

In this June 25, 2011 photo, a woman sleeps on a sidewalk in a neighborhood popularly known as "Crackland" in downtown Sao Paulo. Two decades after the U.S. emerged from the worst of its own crack epidemic, Brazilian authorities are watching the drug spread across their country. They have far fewer resources to deal with it. (AP Photo/Andre Penner)
(AP)

Brazil_Combats_Crack_10_

In this June 28, 2011 photo, pregnant crack addict Taiane is escorted by police to social workers offering drug treatment in the Bonsucesso neighborhood of Rio de Janeiro. Two decades after the U.S. emerged from the worst of its own crack epidemic, Brazilian authorities are watching the drug spread across their country. They have far fewer resources to deal with it. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
(AP)

Brazil_Combats_Crack_6

In this June 28, 2011 photo, a younster sits after police took him to social workers offering drug treatment in the Bonsucesso neighborhood of Rio de Janeiro. Two decades after the U.S. emerged from the worst of its own crack epidemic, Brazilian authorities are watching the drug spread across their country. They have far fewer resources to deal with it. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
(AP)

Brazil_Combats_Crack_3

In this July 27, 2011 photo, people smoke as they sit in an area popularly known as "Crackland" in downtown Sao Paulo. About two decades after the U.S. emerged from the worst of its own crack epidemic, Brazilian authorities are watching the cheap drug spread across their country. In Sao Paulo, the first place in Brazil to have a large consumer market for the drug beginning in the 1990s, police seizure of crack went from 595 kilos in 2006 to 1,636 kilos in 2009, according to federal police. In Rio, arrests related to crack jumped from 546 in 2009 to 2,597 in 2010, according to the research arm of Rio's public safety department. (AP Photo/Andre Penner)
(AP)

Brazil_Combats_Crack_2

In this June 27, 2011 photo, people walk along a street in an area popularly known as "Crackland" in downtown Sao Paulo. About two decades after the U.S. emerged from the worst of its own crack epidemic, Brazilian authorities are watching the cheap drug spread across their country. In Sao Paulo, the first place in Brazil to have a large consumer market for the drug beginning in the 1990s, police seizure of crack went from 595 kilos in 2006 to 1,636 kilos in 2009, according to federal police. (AP Photo/Andre Penner)
(AP)

Brazil_Combats_Crack_7

In this June 28, 2011 photo, a woman stands after being handed over by police to social workers offering drug treatment in the Bonsucesso neighborhood of Rio de Janeiro. About two decades after the U.S. emerged from the worst of its own crack epidemic, Brazilian authorities are watching the cheap drug spread across their country. Children and teenagers picked up since May 31 are being returned to their families, if a family can be found, or forcibly committed to treatment centers especially set up for them, where they can detox with medical support. Adults are offered treatment, but aren't forced into a shelter. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
(AP)

Brazil_Combats_Crack_8

In this June 28, 2011 photo, police try to calm a man as they take him to social workers offering drug treatment in the Bonsucesso neighborhood of Rio de Janeiro. About two decades after the U.S. emerged from the worst of its own crack epidemic, Brazilian authorities are watching the cheap drug spread across their country. Children and teenagers picked up since May 31 are being returned to their families, if a family can be found, or forcibly committed to treatment centers especially set up for them, where they can detox with medical support. Adults are offered treatment, but aren't forced into a shelter. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
(AP)

Brazil_Combats_Crack_13

Members of Brazil's special police unit BOPE take positions in a raid of the Mangueira slum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Sunday June 19, 2011. Hundreds of police officers and troops backed by helicopters and several armored vehicles invaded the shantytown early Sunday. They took control of the slum in what is the first step before installing police units to help pacify the poor community. Police did not face any resistance from drug trafficking gangs in the raid to help bring peace near Maracana stadium ahead of the 2014 World Cup and the 2016 Olympics. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
(AP)

Brazil_Combats_Crack_4

In this June 28, 2011 photo, two alleged drug traffickers are shown to the media with drugs and ammunition allegedly seized from them after a police operation in the Bonsucesso neighborhood of Rio de Janeiro. About two decades after the U.S. emerged from the worst of its own crack epidemic, Brazilian authorities are watching the cheap drug spread across their country. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
(AP)

Brazil_Combats_Crack

In this June 28, 2011 photo, packages of cocaine are shown to the media after they were seized by police during an anti-drug operation in the Bonsucesso neighborhood of Rio de Janeiro. About two decades after the U.S. emerged from the worst of its own crack epidemic, Brazilian authorities are watching the cheap drug spread across their country. In Rio, arrests related to crack jumped from 546 in 2009 to 2,597 in 2010, according to the research arm of Rio's public safety department. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
(AP)

Brazil_Combats_Crack_5

In this June 28, 2011 photo, police stand in a home full of drugs after a police operation against drug traffickers in the Bonsucesso neighborhood of Rio de Janeiro. Two decades after the U.S. emerged from the worst of its own crack epidemic, Brazilian authorities are watching the drug spread across their country. They have far fewer resources to deal with it. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
(AP)

In Booming Brazil, Crackland Thrives

About two decades after the U.S. emerged from the worst of its own crack epidemic, Brazilian authorities are watching the cheap drug spread across this country of 190 million people. 

More From Our Sponsors