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A Fourth of July Weekend Tradition: Immigrants Become U.S. Citizens
Nearly three dozen immigrants, ages 18 to 57, became U.S. citizens in a ceremony on Friday honoring the Fourth of July. Thousands did the same in the last week around the United States and the world.
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Thirty five immigrants became U.S. citizens at a naturalization ceremony in Manhattan Friday. The ceremony, timed to honor the Fourth of July, included five military service men and women, among them Paola Sanchez (far left), a native of Colombia who is a member of the National Guard.
(Photo by E.J. Aguado Jr.)

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Immigrants from 18 different countries took the oath of citizenship at the Fraunces Tavern Museum, a historic landmark in the Financial District of Manhattan, on Jully 1. They were among more than 24,000 people who became U.S. citizens in about 350 ceremonies held across the nation and other countries.
(Photo by E.J. Aguado Jr.)

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The citizens-to-be listen to President Barack Obama speak about becoming a naturalized citizen.
(Photo by E.J. Aguado Jr.)

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Paola Sanchez, a native of Colombia who is a member of the National Guard, holds her new naturalization certificate after the ceremony in Manhattan at Fraunces Tavern Museum, where George Washington said farewell to his troops after the revolutionary war.
(Photo by E.J. Aguado Jr.)

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Ivan Saragusti, an Argentinian immigrant, took the oath of citizenship in Manhattan on July 1. Saragusti is a 21 year old who has been in this country almost 11 years.
(Photo by E.J. Aguado Jr.)

A Fourth of July Weekend Tradition: Immigrants Become U.S. Citizens

Nearly three dozen immigrants, ages 18 to 57, became U.S. citizens in a ceremony on Friday honoring the Fourth of July. Thousands did the same in the last week around the United States and the world.

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